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IMLOCOLINDA's Photo IMLOCOLINDA Posts: 34,104
9/7/19 10:18 P

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The best cure for stressing is to count your blessings...and a long walk won't hurt either!

Never give up what you want the MOST for what you want at the MOMENT!


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IMLOCOLINDA's Photo IMLOCOLINDA Posts: 34,104
3/30/19 8:54 P

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Choteau resident completes 383-mile marathon in the Arctic
"Choteau resident David Hirschfeld just celebrated his 54th birthday. But that’s not the only milestone he’s reached recently.

“I prefer to say 383 because every mile counts,” Hirschfeld said.

Hirschfeld just completed the 6633 Arctic Ultra, a marathon known to be the toughest, coldest and windiest footrace on the planet.

“This race tears up your body, it tears up your mind. Your ability to think clearly and before long after your body is gone and your mind is gone. It starts to tear up your emotions. You’re pretty fragile at that point,” Hirschfeld said.

It took him 207 hours to complete it.

“I told myself I was going to the 380 unless I was injured. I knew I was going to be hurting. I knew I was going to be tired. I knew I was going to be exhausted, fatigued, mentally and emotionally, physically but unless I was hurt, I was doing the 380,” Hirschfeld said.

But that does not account for all the hours of training beforehand. Hirschfeld had a strategy.

“Mine was to stop as few times as possible, even if my progress slowed, keep going until I couldn’t go any farther. Stop. Put up a tent, sleep for a couple of hours. Pack it all back in and go for another 20 hours,” Hirschfeld said.

Unfortunately, not every part of the race can be trained for. One of the participants even had a near-death experience.

“I was terrified. I immediately got to my spot tracker and pressed the help button. I noticed his breathing got shallower and shallower, and then it would stop,” Hirschfeld said.

He’d use his satellite phone to make an emergency call and then wait it out with the man in need until help arrived.

“We’ve done all we could do. We’ve been out of race mode now for three or four hours trying to stay alive. Keep the man alive. That transition going back into race mode was the most painful thing we suffered on this race. It was emotionally draining because what do we do now. A guy nearly died,” Hirschfeld said.

But they would continue on.

“Wherever there was a gap in your clothing, wherever there was the slightest exposed skin, the wind found it. And fighting the wind and having to bundle up enough to stay warm slowed your pace down a lot,” Hirschfeld said.

With blistered feet and swollen legs, all while pulling his own emergency equipment, he persisted.

“There are a thousand words and you can look it up in a thesaurus, but painful is the best way to describe it. It’s dark. You’re alone. I’m going to do whatever’s out there. Throw at me what’s next. Another hill you bet bring it on,” Hirschfeld said.

Hirschfeld finished fourth out of the six participants who completed the race. But it was not all about winning for him.

“God put forth this amazing aurora display. It was the best one we had seen. All different colors all above our heads. It was like fireworks going off. 3 or 4 o’clock, I crossed the finish line and it was over. It was over. Nothing felt as good as it being over,” Hirschfeld said.

“It’s the same reason that people climb mountains. It’s the same reason that people explore the world. I’m not some great adventurer or some amazing athlete, but I think everybody has something in them that calls out. What are you capable of? What can you do? Where is your limit? I found my limit,” Hirschfeld said.

Hirschfeld is encouraging others to test their own limits.

“It’s invigorating. If I can do this, other people can do it too. It takes training. It takes discipline it. I would encourage people to test their limits. Push themselves. It’s a rewarding feeling knowing where your limits are. It’s an amazing thing to see what you can do,” Hirschfeld said."
Elizabeth Transue
KRTV


The best cure for stressing is to count your blessings...and a long walk won't hurt either!

Never give up what you want the MOST for what you want at the MOMENT!


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IMLOCOLINDA's Photo IMLOCOLINDA Posts: 34,104
2/9/19 8:11 P

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I've lost 8 pounds on the Keto Diet since the first of the month!

The best cure for stressing is to count your blessings...and a long walk won't hurt either!

Never give up what you want the MOST for what you want at the MOMENT!


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IMLOCOLINDA's Photo IMLOCOLINDA Posts: 34,104
1/27/19 6:27 P

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"Sheep to Shelf" from the program "Under the Big Sky"
Duckworth is the world’s only source-verified, single-origin, merino wool apparel company. Raised and shorn on the Helle ranch outside Dillon, MT as well as certified Duckworth Wool cooperative growers.

In this Under the Big Sky bonus video, Evan Helle and his father John give us an overview of their single-origin, source-verified wool operation on their family-owned ranching operation.

The Montana-raised sheep spend the long, cold winter months on the Helle family ranch which hugs the boundaries of the Beaverhead-Deer Lodge National forest. Their open-range Montana merino sheep live between 5,000 and 9,500-feet elevation. The specific conditions of the Northern Rockies result in a rare wool, a soft durable fiber with exceptional loft and breathability.

When the sheep move to higher elevations they are cared for by Peruvian shepherds, border collies and guard dogs. This allows the herds to adopt more natural movement and grazing patterns reducing stress and contributing to wool quality.

In Spring, starting at the ranch, the Duckworth team begin the process of sorting the wool for a specific end use, with yarn spinning, knitting, dyeing and finishing carefully managed on site by Duckworth’s technical team. This reduces their environmental footprint from sheep to shelf. Focusing on single-origin wool from their Helle Rambouillet merino is a top priority as more and more wool ships around the world several times before you wear it. This emphasis on locally grown wool sets Duckworth apart in the industry.

Wool made in the country of origin, the United States, creates value-added product for Duckworth’s local economies. Keeping wool science and knowledge at home inspires technical breakthroughs and innovation at every level of the process, building a vibrant and globally competitive textile industry for the long term. This sheep-to-shelf process all begins with a rancher’s stewardship of the land and livestock.

At Duckworth, knowing and using what’s in your own backyard is what really counts. Trust, quality, and comfort are paramount, assured by the pedigree of our wool supply, controlled at every stage of handling. Resurrecting the lost art and craft of American wool is our mission.

For more information on Duckworth visit, www.duckworthco.com

Under the Big Sky® is a storytelling series featuring the interesting people, businesses and stories that are all found under the Big Sky.


The best cure for stressing is to count your blessings...and a long walk won't hurt either!

Never give up what you want the MOST for what you want at the MOMENT!


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IMLOCOLINDA's Photo IMLOCOLINDA Posts: 34,104
10/19/18 10:38 P

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THE NORTHERN CHEYENNE WEST POINT GRADUATE, MICAH HIGHWALKING:

Lieutenant Highwalking is the first Northern Cheyenne graduate of West Point, and only one of five American Indians to have graduated from the elite academy. She is from Lame Deer, Montana and credits her reservation police officer mother's strict household for her success at West Point. After graduation, Lt. Highwalking returned to Lame Deer pre-deployment, and received some of the tribe's highest military honors.

Native American troops represent their tribal nations as military allies of the United States, and I foresee the day when they will wear their nation flags on field uniforms like other US allies.

Courtesy~TheBillingsGazette

The best cure for stressing is to count your blessings...and a long walk won't hurt either!

Never give up what you want the MOST for what you want at the MOMENT!


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IMLOCOLINDA's Photo IMLOCOLINDA Posts: 34,104
9/25/18 10:28 P

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NEW YORK — Two studies out Monday point to significant progress in helping paralyzed people stand and take steps. A new treatment may provide new hope for the nearly 1.3 million Americans who have paralysis from spinal cord injuries.

In 2011, Jeff Marquis crashed his bike on a mountain trail in Montana, leaving him paralyzed from the chest down. A once-active athlete and professional chef, Marquis needed constant care.

But today Marquis can walk again, something people with paralysis can only imagine. He can do it because of a remarkable new experimental device, a type of electrical stimulator.

Spinal injuries disrupt nerve pathways that ordinarily allow the brain to signal the legs to move. In a study, doctors implanted an electrical stimulator at the base of the spine. When it’s turned on, the electrical signals appear to awaken those injured nerve pathways, allowing the brain to communicate with the legs again.

Marquis, now 35, was one of four patients who spent months doing intensive physical training at the University of Louisville Spinal Cord Injury Research Center. He said first he got his right foot moving and then his left.

“It’s certainly a welcome change from being in a chair all the time and kind of a ray of sunshine in my prognosis,” Marquis said.

He walked the length of one football field without rest, and then almost a quarter of a mile over a one-hour session.

“It takes so much concentration that I don’t get emotional in the moment,” Marquis said. That is, until he told his parents.

“I showed them the video because I knew I wouldn’t… because I couldn’t get the words out,” he said.

“They’re able to walk independently, its not the same as before the injury, but it’s a significant level of recovery,” said Susan Harkema, who directs the research.

Marquis said he now has more energy and no longer needs daily help at home. Researchers now hope to perform larger studies with more patients. But this technology is still years away from wide scale use.

© 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


The best cure for stressing is to count your blessings...and a long walk won't hurt either!

Never give up what you want the MOST for what you want at the MOMENT!


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IMLOCOLINDA's Photo IMLOCOLINDA Posts: 34,104
9/13/18 10:16 P

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WNBA All-Star MVP Shoni Schimmel to Hold Basketball Clinic in Pablo, Montana on October 5th
by Native News Online Staff / Currents / 03 Oct 2014
WNBA Atlanta Dream Shoni Schimmel


PABLO, MONTANA –Atlanta Dream guard Shoni Schimmel (Umatilla), the MVP of the 2014 WNBA All-Star Game, will hold a basketball clinic Sunday, October 5 at the Joe McDonald Gym on the campus of the Salish-Kootenai College in Pablo, Montana.

The clinic is for boys and girls ages 7-18. Cost is $60 and runs one day only from 10 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. This will be Schimmel’s only appearance in Montana.

Schimmel, a 5-9 rookie guard out of Louisville, scored a WNBA All-Star Game record 29 points last July in Phoenix. A 2013 All-American and a 2010 Parade High School All-American, she was the eighth pick overall, drafted in the first round by the Dream. Schimmel is a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Mission, Oregon.

For more information about the clinic, contact Monty Marengo at 406-212-1699.

The best cure for stressing is to count your blessings...and a long walk won't hurt either!

Never give up what you want the MOST for what you want at the MOMENT!


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IMLOCOLINDA's Photo IMLOCOLINDA Posts: 34,104
9/6/18 10:36 P

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By Michelle Bigelbach
The Courier
Saco Graduate Makes Medical Breakthrough for Alzheimer's

September 5, 2018

"Promise me, when you grow up, you'll use your brain instead of your back," a mother tells her daughter as they tiredly dig out a flooded ditch on the family farm. That daughter, Miranda (Yeska) Orr, followed her mother Carolyn's advice, and is now a VA research health scientist at the South Texas Veterans Health Care System, faculty member of the Sam and Ann Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, faculty member with the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's & Neurodegenerative Disease and instructor of pharmacology at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas. She has spent a great deal of time studying how Alzheimer's affects the brain and is making strides in researching how to stop the progression with the eventual goal of curing Alzheimer's.

A 1998 graduate of Saco High School, Orr recently led research showing a type of cellular stress, that is known to be involved in cancer and aging, has now been implicated for the first time in Alzheimer's. The research also showed that with the right combination of medication, Alzheimer's can be managed. Her research was published in the journal Aging Cell on Aug. 20, with much popularity in the science and medical community. To put into perspective how successful her study is, 6,000 papers are published every day from various fields of science, and a couple of days after publication, Orr's research was trending at number 13. Since the publication of the study, Orr has received correspondence from all over the world, including Australia and China, praising her work in this medical breakthrough.

The team found that stress, called cellular senescence, is associated with harmful tau protein tangles, one of two proteins that are in the brain, which are hallmarks in 20 human brain diseases, including Alzheimer's and traumatic brain injury. According to Orr, cellular senescence allows the stressed cells to survive, but the cell becomes zombie-like, functioning abnormally and secreting substances that kill the cells around it. "When cells enter this stage, they change their genetic programming and become toxic," said Orr. "Their existence means the death of surrounding tissue, which then affects the functionality of the brain to control other parts of the body."

The discovery was found in four types of mice that model Alzheimer's disease. The researchers then used a combination of drugs, including a natural compound and a chemotherapy drug that is already FDA approved to treat leukemia, to clear the senescent cells from the brains of Alzheimer's mice, whose age was equivalent to 65-70 year-olds in human years. After three months of treatment, the findings were unlike anything the researchers anticipated. "The mice were 20 months old and had advanced brain disease when the therapy was started. After clearing the zombie cells, we saw improvements in brain structure and function. The treatment seems to have stopped the disease in its tracks," said Orr.

Even though this medical breakthrough has been discovered, Orr and her team are cautious about whether this research will be an ultimate cure. Currently, the scientists are testing younger mice to determine how early the drugs can be given to have an effect to slow down the progression of the disease. "We also have to determine how long it takes for new zombie cells to come back after being treated with the drugs," said Orr. Now that the research is out there and public, other scientists need to replicate the findings to ensure the reproducibility among many laboratories and maybe even have a new spin on what Orr and her team did. The team is already discussing whether it is time to proceed with a clinical study to test the combination of drugs in humans who have mild cognitive impairment, which according to Orr, can be a risk of developing Alzheimer's later in life.

It's hard to believe how far Orr has come since graduating from Saco High School. Upon graduation, she started at Montana State University-Bozeman majoring in art, and then noticed her roommate's pre-med textbooks. She quickly realized she found her roommate's textbooks more interesting than her own and changed her life course. She transferred to Montana State University–Billings where she graduated with her pre-med degree. While enrolled in college, her family went through a trying time after her grandmother, Vivian Siewing, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and knowing there is no cure. With the disease hitting so close to home, she made it her mission that after graduating from MSU-Billings, she was going to cure Alzheimer's in her lifetime.

After working at her uncle Gary Porter's embryo transfer company, which jumpstarted her scientific career, Orr applied to the Montana State University neuroscience graduate program in 2005. She attained a joint PhD between MSU-Bozeman and the McLaughlin Research Institute for Biomedical Sciences in Great Falls. Being a scientist was not even a thought to Orr until she was in college. "I wanted to become a doctor to cure Alzheimer's. It wasn't until my college advisor told me, 'If you want to cure Alzheimer's, you need to become a scientist, not a doctor.' I could not wrap my mind around what my advisor told me," said Orr. In 2007, she moved to Great Falls to complete her research at the McLaughlin Research Institute with then director, Dr. George Carlson, and then in 2010 moved to San Antonio and started her post-doc work in 2012. In 2016, she was promoted to faculty and has since received competitive grants to fund her research from both the VA and National Institute of Health.

To say her family is proud of her accomplishments is an understatement. "There are no words for how proud I am of her," stated her mother, Carolyn Yeska. "She has always been studious in school and keeps pushing forward, never stopping. I am thrilled she is making such strides in finding a cure for a disease that I will get later in life." Her uncle Gary shared the same sentiment stating "She was always easy to teach, intelligent. I am honored to have created an environment for her to flourish in her current field." Her father, Jay, beamed with pride stating "It impresses me that these findings can help cure other diseases. Everyone reading and looking at her study can use her research as a way to think outside of the box, which only will improve the field."

Orr's hope with this study and future studies is that in 10 years the findings she discovered in mice will work in humans and work to stop the disease. There are currently strides being made in other studies with Alzheimer's in mind, and Orr's study will only help those scientists with their research. With each new study published, new scientists entering the field with new ideas, and current scientists finding different angles, only more good things will come in finding a cure for the disease.



The best cure for stressing is to count your blessings...and a long walk won't hurt either!

Never give up what you want the MOST for what you want at the MOMENT!


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IMLOCOLINDA's Photo IMLOCOLINDA Posts: 34,104
8/7/18 9:30 P

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Thought it might be fun to pull this one up from the archives and see if anyone has new stories to post.

The best cure for stressing is to count your blessings...and a long walk won't hurt either!

Never give up what you want the MOST for what you want at the MOMENT!


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KACYBEE15's Photo KACYBEE15 Posts: 383
7/8/11 10:06 A

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Montana is the 8th Skinniest State in the Country!!! Woohoo!!

billingsgazette.com/news/local/artic
le
_371ccacf-851a-5af9-8ce6-6da925a2a94R>9.html?oCampaign=hottopics


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KACYBEE15's Photo KACYBEE15 Posts: 383
4/5/11 11:54 A

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Another great article about people helping people!

billingsgazette.com/news/local/artic
le
_3110943e-ef4f-52c2-9b00-e61dcd7e9b1R>f.html


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KACYBEE15's Photo KACYBEE15 Posts: 383
3/23/11 1:44 P

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This is an article I found on billingsgazette.com, but it takes place in MISSOULA! It's about a fitness program designed especially for cancer patients and survivors. I believe the last few lines of the article say it all:

"Rott knows the psychic and physical importance of exercise and therapy in battling a deadly disease.
"Fear is a really hard thing to overcome," she said. "(Cancer is) just that six-letter word. But exercise makes you feel strong and as you feel stronger physically, you feel stronger mentally.
"You feel like you aren't as fragile anymore."


billingsgazette.com/lifestyles/healt
h-
med-fit/article_b2e8696f-566e-5223-bR>df8-a21f1a47e3d2.html


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KACYBEE15's Photo KACYBEE15 Posts: 383
3/23/11 1:35 P

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Hi Everyone!!

This is a thread where we can post inspirational stories related to health from around the state. It's good to live under the Big Sky!!

Looking forward to sharing the inspiration!!

~ Kayli

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