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Tips on choosing fictional names, by Elizabeth Sims and Writer's Digest:



www.facebook.com/writersdigest/photo
s/
a.79090920378/10156281975710379/?typR>e=3&theater


Lou

Edited by: IUHRYTR at: 10/11/2018 (21:50)
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9/25/18 6:27 P

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When to punctuate? What to punctuate?

www.writermag.com/2018/07/10/punctua
ti
on-bootcamp/


Lou

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9/8/18 10:57 A

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If you want to be a successful writer and do not own a cat, read this article that tells why you may want to adopt a feline companion: emoticon

www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-6
13
5513/Close-bond-authors-cats-celebraR>ted-new-book.html


Lou emoticon

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Do you allow your writing ideas to percolate by procrastinating? If not, maybe you should. Read why here:

www.writermag.com/2018/08/21/defense
-p
rocrastination/?utm_source=sfmc-newsR>letter&utm_medium=email&utm_
ca
mpaign=procrastination


Toward the end of this article are comments by a writer that tie in with Kasey's recent post about 10-minutes.

Lou

Edited by: IUHRYTR at: 9/8/2018 (06:51)
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Punctuation tips:

www.writermag.com/2018/07/10/punctua
ti
on-bootcamp/?utm_source=Mailings&R>;utm_campaign=Welcome+to+Punctuation
+B
oot+Camp&utm_medium=email


Lou

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7/9/18 3:29 P

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Many tips and helpful resources:

diymfa.com/

Lou

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4/8/18 12:00 P

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Strunk & White's Elements of Style has long been considered the go-to source for writing "correctness."

www.bartleby.com/141/index.html

This site offers easily explained examples of correct and incorrect writing to help us all improve our projects.

Enjoy!

Lou

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Ever listened to a podcast?

There should be many here of interest to us all:

www.writersdigest.com/podcasts/best-
po
dcasts-for-writers-101-best-websitesR>-for-writers


Let us know which ones you listen to and what you learned from them.

Lou

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2/19/18 12:06 A

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Writing is often a lonely task. Here are ideas on how to break out of the feeling of isolation:

www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/w
ri
ters-perspective/the-writing-life/hoR>w-to-avoid-lonely-writer-syndrome


(Did you catch the proofreading error?)

Lou

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Ten tips to keep your writing career prospering:

www.freelancewritinggigs.com/2018/02
/d
estroy-freelance-writing-career/?utmR>_content=buffer2229c&utm_medium=
so
cial&utm_source=facebook.com
&u
tm_campaign=buffer


Lou

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Sites offering good writing advice:

www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/
we
bsites-for-writers-19-sites-with-greR>at-writing-advice


Lou

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Thinking of writing your life story?

Here are prompts to help you along:

www.writersdigest.com/writing-articl
es
/by-writing-genre/memoir-by-writing-R>genre/10-easy-writing-prompts-to-get
-y
our-life-story-started


Lou

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2/4/18 3:45 P

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emoticon for the writing prompts. The links will come in handy for when I am clueless to a topic.



Graduated With Highest Honors In Fitness And Nutrition From Stratford Career Institute.

You Only Grow Old If You Want To!



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Is your writing stuck? Here are more prompts:

www.writermag.com/writing-prompts/

Lou

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This was a free download of writing prompts, motivation, and more:

instituteforwriters.lpages.co/ifw-me
mb
ership-interest-page/


Lou

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Think you know your plurals?

www.bunchkins.com/can-identify-plura
l-
tough-words/


Lou

(This experienced editor got an A+)

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The link wouldn't load.

Always check a link after posting to ensure it works. Sometimes SP screws things up.

Lou

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I thought this article was extremely good. I hope the link works for you. If not, tell me and I will play around with it..

858.111.myftpupload.com/2017/03/07/h
ow
-to-develop-relationships-with-otherR>-writers/


Have a good one.

emoticon emoticon

Graduated With Highest Honors In Fitness And Nutrition From Stratford Career Institute.

You Only Grow Old If You Want To!



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"Nigglywiggly" is the name of the little paper flag thingy sticking out of the top of Hershey's kisses.



Lou

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From my experience, and going through my tax returns, I compiled this list of tax deductions for writers that may be useful for you.
*********************************
CAUTION: Consult a tax professional to ascertain which of these, or others, may be suitable for your particular situation!
*********************************
Advertising. Business cards, brochures, fliers,etc.

Bad debts. If someone has owed you for more than two years and you can show proof of trying to collect.

Bank Charges. You must keep a separate account for your writing expenses.

Camera/Tape Recorder. You may have to prorate these if you also use them for personal use. If you use them 100% for business, i.e., film for a seminar, cassette tapes you bought for an interview, film developing, etc., 100% is deductible. And don’t forget repairs on them.

Cards and Gifts.

Car expenses. You can take actual expenses -- prorated gas, oil, repairs, insurance, license tags, etc., but if you do this you have to keep all receipts -- or it’s simpler and usually better just to take the mileage deduction allowed by IRS. Keep track of all your miles to the post office, office supply store, to meet a writer for lunch, writers’ clubs and seminars, anything connected with writing.

Commissions. For example, if you had an agent.

Depreciation. On office equipment or a computer that cost over $100 and is expected to last over a year. This can be taken over several years or there is a way it can all be taken the first year. (Lou's note: If you use a tax preparation service such as TurboTax as I do, it will compute this for you.)

Dues for Business Organizations. Such as writer's organizations.

Fees. For writing contests you enter or costs to display at conventions, etc..

Insurance. If you rent an office and have insurance and/or if you have an office in your home, you can take a portion of the insurance; or if you have separate insurance on your equipment. Include a portion of your car insurance.

Internet.

Legal and Professional Expenses. If you pay someone to do your income taxes or if you pay someone to look over a contract or to try to collect money owed you.

Loss. It may be possible that you might show a loss on books sold.

Meals and Entertainment. If you take a writer or client you are interviewing to dinner, for example. Don’t forget such things as tips, parking, etc. However, only 50% of this is
deductible.

Mortgage. If you deduct for a home office, a portion of your mortgage is deductible.

Office expense. This is not office supplies. This is anything you do to your office in the way of decorating, repairs, carpet, drapes, etc.

Postage. If you send query letters, requests for writer's guidelines, etc., by regular mail.

Publications. Any magazines, books, newspapers, etc., you buy can be deducted as a possible market.

Printing and Copies.

Rent or Lease. If you rent or lease any business equipment. Be careful here, however; if you end up buying the equipment then you may have to go back to the first year and show depreciation for the time you had it.

Repairs and Maintenance. Any repairs on your equipment, or if you purchase a maintenance agreement.

Subcontracting. For example, if you pay someone to transcribe an interview for you.

Supplies. Here is where you list all your office supplies. Don’t forget little things like staples, paper clips, pens, correction fluid, rubber bands, etc.

Taxes and licenses. Any taxes or licenses you need for your business.

Tax preparation fees.

Telephone.

Travel. This is not car expenses shown above; this is such things as plane tickets, rental cars, cab fares, parking fees, tolls, etc., that strictly relate to your writing projects.

Utilities. For a rented office, or if you have an office in your home, you can prorate your utilities.

These deductions are placed line by line on your Schedule C for a self-employed person.

** If you claim a home office, you may also prorate deductions on such things as landscaping, repairs, exterminating, carpet cleaning, real estate taxes, interest and house insurance, plus depreciation. This gets sticky, so talk to someone before deducting a home office.

Lou

Edited by: IUHRYTR at: 8/28/2017 (15:18)
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From www.almostanauthor.com

30 Necessary Terms for Magazine Article Writing

Focus Is Key to Magazine Writing by Terry Whalin

Here are thirty important terms that we can learn together as we continue our journey into magazine article writing.

Advertorial: A newspaper or magazine advertisement in the form of editorial content. The term is a blend of the words “advertisement” and “editorial.”

Byline: A printed line of text accompanying a news story, article, or the like, giving the author’s name.

Charticle: A graphic image that includes information.

Clip: Examples of your work. Place them in your portfolio.

Consumer publication: Magazines and newspapers sold to the public.

Copywriting: Writing business and promotional copy for clients.

Creative brief: A short document that provides the creative team with an overview and important points to consider in the development of an advertising campaign.

Custom publication: This is created specifically for a company.

Dek: The second half of a headline which often runs in italics just below the headline in newspapers.

Deliverable: The final project you will be providing.

Dummy copy: A representation of the final copy in which a different text is substituted for the final text. The different text is called Lorem ipsum and is there just for layout purposes.

FOB: Front of the book pieces. These short articles and blurbs usually appear in the front of a magazine.

FPO: For position only. This abbreviation is used when artwork or other materials are inserted as placeholders in an article or brochure to give all stakeholders a general idea of how the final piece will lay out.

Hed: Abbreviation for the headline.

Infographic: Information graphics is a visual image such as a chart or diagram used to represent information.

Kicker: The conclusion of an article designed to leave the reader with something to think on.

“Kill” fee: A negotiated payment the writer gets if the assigned article is canceled.

Lede: The lede, or lead, is an abbreviation for the opening sentences of your article.

Letter of introduction (LOI): Pitch letter or email to a potential client informing them of your talents.

Native ads: Online version of advertorials.

Nut graf: The paragraph that goes from the lede into the body of the article. The nut graf summarizes the article to entice readers to keep reading. You may also see “graf” used as an abbreviation for a paragraph.

Op-Ed: An opinion or editorial piece in which writers state their points of view on an issue. Letters to the editor are a prime example.

Query: An article pitch. Check out last month’s article for in-depth information. www.almostanauthor.com/query-letter-
ba
sics/


Red ink: Term used for the editor’s changes to your article.

Sidebar: A related short addition to an article.

Subhed: Journalistic abbreviation for a subhead.

Tagline: Author information that appears at the end of an article.

TK: Abbreviation for “to come.” Used for photos, captions, sidebars — anything that is expected but hasn’t arrived yet

Trade publication: These regional or national publications target people in a specific field.

Work for hire: You give the client or publication all of the rights to the piece you are writing.

Lou

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Did You Know?

Poisonous vs. Venomous

Plants are poisonous and animals, like spiders and snakes, are venomous.

When you're writing (or talking), make sure you don't ask if a snake is poisonous!

Lou

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Tips on writing to publishing from 16 agents:

www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/g
ui
de-to-literary-agents/16-agents-sharR>e-34-tips-success-studying-market-pr
op
er-querying


Lou

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Ran across one of these on Facebook and found so many other fascinating ones here:

www.pinterest.com/pin/45169703761197
84
19/


Lou

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New YouTube series from experienced writer on all things writing.

www.youtube.com/channel/UC9GYWs2gcMl
Rl
u224evK3ZQ?inf_contact_key=26881da8bR>54944356ddd22edf5bd42d159cac37f9da29
e9
bde1fe15f2df77b70&app=desktop


Lou

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Free webinar on revising your manuscript:

SparkPeople isn't allowing a link to go through for my post so you will have to copy and paste in a browser:

https://register.gotowebinar.com/registe
r/5305295720308552193

Lou

Edited by: IUHRYTR at: 7/13/2017 (15:42)
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ABBYSHARPE's Photo ABBYSHARPE SparkPoints: (15,089)
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7/12/17 2:07 P

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I don't know if I'd describe those words as colorful. But that could be Kirk and Spock's fault, for talking about colorful metaphors.

I've used some.



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Do you use these colorful words in your writing?

www.buzzfeed.com/danieldalton/bob-om
bi
nate?sub=3717607_5193424&utm_terR>m=.jendP3kapz#.qsdxYB3RWg


Lou

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6/28/17 10:17 A

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Oh, yeah, you have to write what you're comfortable with. I write details. My mom has read them. If my kids want to, I'm not going to say no. (I'd much rather they read about consensual sex than graphic murders.)

Readers can tell when you're shying away from things. If you don't want to write the love scenes, there's nothing wrong with closing the door when they get to the bedroom.



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Handling matters of a risque nature in writing:

www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/g
ui
de-to-literary-agents/handling-risquR>e-parts-writing-romance


Lou

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5/30/17 10:06 A

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Oh, romance writers are all about the eyes. ;)



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How do you describe eyes in your stories?

www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/t
he
re-are-no-rules/eyes-curious-use-eyeR>s-fiction


Lou

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Tips for aspiring, and experienced writers:

www.theguardian.com/books/2017/may/1
3/
so-you-want-to-be-a-writer-colum-mccR>anns-tips-for-young-novelists?CMP=sh
ar
e_btn_fb


Lou

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11/30/16 12:43 A

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11/22/16

Did you tell yourself you would "never" learn to walk or read or drive or use a computer...?

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/21/16 12:53 P

I use white noise when I work...

Sometimes I listen to the radio...

But mostly white noise...

FITNESSGRAD
*********
11/9/16 8:38 P

I could never write a book. Cookbook, maybe.

FITNESSGRAD
*********
11/9/16 7:24 P

Query letters:

networlding.com/how-to-write-a-submi
ss
ion-letter-to-a-publisher/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/7/16 2:00 P

www.dreamhomebasedwork.com/full-time
-f
reelance-writer/

I thought this was neat and thought I would share.

FITNESSGRAD
*********
8/16/16

128 ways to avoid using "very" in your manuscript:

mentalfloss.com/article/82484/replac
e-
word-very-one-these-128-modifiers

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
8/1/16 10:30 P

Good advice on overcoming writer's block:

networlding.com/7-creative-writing-e
xe
rcises-you-can-do-right-now/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
7/3/16 10:12 P

Know what an ISBN and UPC are? If you plan on ever publishing a book in any format, Melissa G. Wilson tells all about them:

networlding.com/isbn-vs-upc/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
6/2/16 5:11 A

Capitalize internet or not?

No longer, according to the Associated Press Stylebook. This is one of the top resources for editors and writers.

www.ap.org/Content/Press-Release/201
6/
AP-style-changes-take-effect-with-deR>bu
t-of-redesigned-Stylebook

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
4/28/16 11:01 P

Need background on murderers for your book?

Check out: murderpedia.org/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
2/8/16 7:43 A

Hi all ~~

* “The zombie was wearing a pink carnation.”

* Is it said Squiggly? or Squiggly said?

* Here's the answer: The name comes first in dialogue tags.

“The zombie was wearing a pink carnation,” Squiggly said.

* It’s the same for pronouns. The pronoun comes first too.

“The zombie was wearing a pink carnation,” he said.

The who said it is the important part, so it comes first.

**This was cut-and-pasted from. www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/
gr
ammar/dialogue-tags

Visit there for more tips!

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
1/8/16 4:55 A

Just got this today on Facebook:

www.jerryjenkins.com/finish-your-boo
k-
16

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
10/19/15 4:24 P

Video #2: Avoid the Trap of Tired, Typical Writing

compeltraining.com/trapoftiredwritin
g/
?inf_contact_key=f38048b0c0fbca97793R>bb
27976785566f305909e43fb1c5b6d7cb41
166535ae8

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
10/15/15 4:50 P

A video on The Writing Journey and Key Habits:

compeltraining.com/writingandkeyhabi
ts
/?inf_contact_key=3f1080480e3b4bc6bcR>f1
e1951d15154434149be8b74b755bd9664c
dd
fe19326d

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
10/15/15 4:32 P

A free, good, informative monthly newsletter from a college classmate:

adriennemoch.com

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
10/14/15 12:32 P

Do you tell yourself these lies about your writing?

www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/
5-
lies-writers-tell-themselves/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
10/9/15 8:47 A

Oh, yeah. My skin's gotten real thick over the past few years.

ABBYSHARPE
www.facebook.com/AbigailSharpeBooks
*********
10/7/15 11:47 A

Writers should never shy away from constructive comments whether they be positive or negative. We, as writers, need thick skins. Remember, if someone offers a negative review of your work, it may mean you're not getting your point across as you thought. Take criticism with a grain of salt though because some people are biased in their thinking. Pick out the points of their comments you believe are valid and use them to make your work better.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
6/18/15 3:22 P

Good source of writing information:

www.creativity-portal.com/howto/writ
in
g/writing.html

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
1/31/15 6:11 P

Lots of writing tips here:

www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
12/3/14 4:14 P

Programs for writing help:

killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/03
/w
rite-aids.html

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/25/14 12:32 P

Good resources:

killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/05
/c
rime-writing-resources.html

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/14/14 11:34 A

Good advice!
*******
The Kill Zone
Hey, Butt Out! I’m Reading Here©
Posted: 21 Apr 2014 12:30 AM PDT
by Robert Dugoni

I raise more than a few eyebrows when I teach, and that’s usually a good sign. I know I’ve got my students thinking. The first collective class-eyebrow-arch comes when I stand up and say, “No one can teach you how to write.” Students who’ve paid good money to be in one of my seminars or workshops begin to have immediate heart palpitations until I add, “But I can teach you how to teach yourselves how to write.”

So what do I mean by this?

How can I teach any student I don’t know intimately what to write or how to write it? I can’t even teach my two children how to write. Writing is an extraordinarily personal endeavor and each of us brings our own nuances, quirks, insights and experiences to not only what we write but how we write it. All of these things form what we frequently refer to as the writer’s “voice” – how the writer (and really her characters) views the world and others in it and how the character expresses that view. We hope that it is a unique and exciting and interesting. When it is, those are usually the novels publishers clamor to buy.

But the fact is the to-be-published novel will never make it that far if the author forsakes the craft of writing and makes one of those silly mistakes that cry out “amateur” to that would-be editor.

So rather than telling students “I can teach you how to write,” I tell them my job is “to remove as many obstacles in the path to publication as possible.”

One of those big obstacles is when the author intrudes into the story.

Author intrusions into the reader’s experience reading a novel can be deadly. Not only do they raise the “amateur” flag and slow the story pace, they also tend to annoy. It’s like being in a deep and meaningful conversation with one person and having another person continually interrupt that conversation to tell you things you really don’t need to know at that moment or, frankly, you don’t care about!

When a story unfolds, the opening chapters should develop like a play on a stage. The reader wants to see what the character sees, hear what she hears, smell what she smells, taste what she tastes, and touch what she touches. It is not the author experiencing the story. It is the reader experiencing the story through the character. So how does the author intrude?

Let us count just some of the ways.

~ Omniscient narrative

This occurs when you’re reading a scene from a particular character’s point of view and suddenly the author barges in to provide a bit of information that the character doesn’t yet know, couldn’t yet know and may never know. Sometimes this is called bad foreshadowing. Here’s an example:

You’ve just written a killer scene in which your protagonist has arrived at a mountain getaway for three days of R&R and the author ends the scene with something like, “Little did she know that three miles away, Luke Reddinger, a serial killer, had just escaped from the state penitentiary.” Okay, so if the character didn’t know, who’s throwing in this tidbit? Does the reader need it at that moment? Would it be more powerful to see Luke Reddinger escaping, or running through the woods, maybe seeing the cabin she has arrived at? Wouldn’t that raise a story question that would keep the reader reading to find out what happens? Isn’t that what every writer wants?

~ Unnecessary biographical information

Ever read a scene in a book that is going swimmingly when suddenly the author stops the flow of the dialogue and action to tell you where the main character went to high school, their major in college or that their great grandmother was an alcoholic? Unless that high school is going to play a part in the story, the major is important to illustrate the character’s skill, or grandma is a serial killer when she gets drunk, what was the point of interrupting the story? Biographical sketches, if you’re so inclined to do them, are for the author to get to know her characters so the author better understands how the character will act and what she might say in a particular situation or moment. They are not for the reader.

~ Author Opinions

Nothing is more transparent than when an author tries to ram her opinion on a topic down your throat. Even when the author tries to disguise the opinion as a “character’s opinion” it is usually easy to spot. “Mary asked John what he thought about President Obama’s health care reform.” And then John starts spouting off. This is one of those instances where the author would be better off showing rather than telling. If you want to make a statement about the death penalty, write The Green Mile and let us see one of the pitfalls of the ultimate punishment. You want to write about abortion, write The Cider House Rules. You want to write on the evils of slavery, write Twelve Years a Slave. Racism in the south – Mississippi Burning. Greed in the roaring twenties – The Great Gatsby. There’s no place like home – The Wizard of Oz. And so on…

~ Flashbacks

This is usually the cause of the third collective class-eyebrow-arch. Some even snap at this point. Why? Because so many of us use flashbacks in our novels. So before anyone snaps an eyebrow, let me clarify – flashbacks can be used. The author just needs to know how to use them so they are not an intrusion. First, a flashback, despite its name, must still move the story forward. That is, the flashback should impart some information that is relevant to the plot at that moment, drives the plot forward, and/or reveals some important character trait or relationship that will come into play.

Second, a flashback is a scene. Therefore, all of the things discussed above that go into making a great scene still apply. A flashback should not be some character sitting alone at a table reminiscing about something that happened in the past. Put the reader in the scene with the characters and allow the reader to hear and see and smell and taste and touch the scene as it unfolds.

Think about the movie Titanic. Regardless of your opinion on the movie itself, note that it was actually Rose reminiscing about her voyage on that ship. How boring would it have been if the entire three-hour movie was Rose sitting at a table telling the movie audience what happened, rather than the movie audience flashing back to that time and getting the chance to experience it?

~ Information Dumps

This is usually where the writer has done a lot of research on a particular subject and darn it, everyone is going to know it! An information dump is an excessive amount of unnecessary information or details dumped into the story when the character does not need it and might never need it. Like biographies, research is for the author, not the reader. I’d say less than 10% of the information I research and learn about goes into my novels.

Information dumps can take many forms.

Research details. The research dump is when the author has learned a lot of information on a particular subject and dumps it into the story either in omniscient narrative or thinly disguised by creating a “character” to tell the reader everything they needed to know about such things as growing vegetables on rooftop gardens in New York City during the depression.

Character descriptions. Other information dumps are excessive details about what every character who comes on stage is wearing, or looks like. What the character is wearing is only important if the author has set the scene up so that another character has a particular interest in what a particular character is wearing, or the character’s own choice of clothes is important. When your character walks into a high school prom we can assume the girls are wearing prom dresses and the guys are in tuxedos. But if you’ve set the story up so that Billy is determined to make a splash and wears a tear-away tuxedo intending to leave high school by doing the Full Monty, then we want to know the details of that tear-away tuxedo.

Setting. The same is true with excessive details to describe a setting. Authors are not weather men or travel guides so your scenes shouldn’t read like a weather report or travel book. And if your protagonist is running for her life through a forest while being chased by werewolves, please don’t have her take the time to tell us every species of tree and type of fauna they are running past. Necessary details only. Excessive details need not apply!

So when you have the urge to pontificate, opine, brag, or otherwise bore, think about what my friend and brilliant writer John Hough Jr always says: “Dialogue is action and action is dialogue.” Get your characters on the move and talking. Avoid staying too long in a character’s head. Do your biographies and research for you, not for the reader, and give us only those details that will keep the story moving forward.

And above all, once you’ve hooked us with an incredible opening, lured us in with an amazing character, and mesmerized us with a killer plot, then please, BUTT OUT! I’ll thank you to let me enjoy your beautifully crafted story on my own.

Robert Dugoni is the critically acclaimed and New York Times Best Selling Author of the David Sloane series, The Jury Master, Wrongful Death, Bodily Harm, Murder One and The Conviction. He is also the author of the best-selling stand-alone novel Damage Control, as well as the nonfiction expose, The Cyanide Canary. Dugoni’s books have been likened to Scott Turow and Nelson DeMille, and he has been hailed as “the undisputed king of the legal thriller” by The Providence Journal and called the “heir to Grisham’s literary throne.” Bodily Harm and Murder One were each chosen one of the top 5 thrillers of 2010 and 2011, respectively. Murder One was also a finalist for the Harper Lee Award for literary excellence. My Sister’s Grave is the first in the Tracy Crosswhite series. Visit his website at www.robertdugoni.com, email him at bob@robertdugoni.com, and follow him on Twitter @robertdugoni and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/AuthorRobertDugoni.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/14/14 10:31 P

Receive daily writing tips here:

www.dailywritingtips.com/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
8/16/14 12:23 P

A guide to grammar and writing:

grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
7/9/14 3:54 P

Paths to having your book published:

clickingkeys.com/2014/07/09/the-path
s-
to-publication/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
6/19/14 12:15 P

ALWAYS have a knowledgeable person read your manuscript BEFORE sending it to an editor to check for proper punctuation, spelling, etc. Doing so will allow the editor to focus on the bigger picture -- consistency, character believability, plot, etc.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
12/2/13 12:58 P

*snort*

www.facebook.com/AbigailSharpeBooks

ABBYSHARPE
*********
11/26/13 3:57 P

Maybe if he smelled like an orange?

(You have to read Proofreading Humor to get this one, folks.)

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/26/13 10:04 A

Right! Some cologne scents I recognize, but I really just want a man to smell good. I don't care how. :)

www.facebook.com/AbigailSharpeBooks

ABBYSHARPE
*********
8/12/13 2:04 P

I've wondered why so many mysteries describe a man as wearing expensive cologne. Maybe there is a different scent between expensive and inexpensive colognes but do you think most people would notice?

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
1/5/13 6:50 A

Write about what moves you.
https://www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public
_journal_individual.asp?blog_id=5191090

Www.facebook.com/rabbitearfilms www.monadnockfilm.com

JSTETSER
*********
3/22/12 6:44 A

Be aware of using repetitive phrases; they turn readers off.

A book I recently finished used the phrase "hooded eyes" every time the author referenced her bad guy. The one I'm reading now has referred to an early 20s female as "young lady" probably 30 times and I'm only half-way through the story. Another recent one must have used "little" to describe everything from a "little lake" to a "little cabin" to a "little diner."

What is disappointing to me as a reader and an editor is the praise these authors heap on their editors when they should be aware of their own writing and should find an editor who will not allow such boring writing to occur.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
9/8/11 1:32 A

I went and saw her movie and thought about that how they turned her down 60 times.

Linda -- LINDAINOHIO
*********
9/7/11 3:38 P

Punctuation advice:

grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/quotat
io
n-marks-with-periods-and-commas.aspxR>?W
T.mc_id=0

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
8/13/11 4:52 P

Dealing with rejection -- 60 times!

www.more.com/kathryn-stockett-help-b
est-seller

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
8/2/11 6:03 A

How to create a villain in our stories:

www.magicalwords.net/really-i-mean-i
t/
how-to-build-a-villain-by-jim-butcher/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
7/15/11 4:33 P

Another information-filled site:

www.theperfectwrite.com

But remember, I am also available for editing.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
7/7/11 10:10 P

Here's a site full of information on writing:

www.dailywritingtips.com/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
3/1/11 8:53 P

For Writer's Digest magazine: www.writersdigest.com

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
2/18/11 8:50 P

This site is run by the two guys who wrote "The Weekend Novelist." Has some great insights:

weekendnovelist.com/website_rewrite/
we
ekend_novelist_blog/

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
Here is information on query letters:

www.queryshark.blogspot.com

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
2/9/11 8:42 P

Here's a good site for writing tips:

www.copyblogger.com

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
2/8/11 2:50 A

Here is a fun site with free contests and solid tips:

www.readingwriters.com/TheVERBhotp.h
tm

What I like about her short story contests is that she sets certain parameters for every story in the contests she runs. That helps framing a story easier, I believe. But she must not have read my last entry, "Night of the Halloween Moon" because it didn't win that contest. (Just kidding.)

If you are a romance writer, a good magazine to begin reading is Womans World that pays well for a mini-romance every week. It will be on the news stand at grocery store checkout.

Also, don't forget Writer's Market. If you or anyone is not familiar with it, the library should have it or, if you can afford a copy (about $27.00), get it at any bookstore.

Best of success to you. Keep us updated.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
7/8/10 5:31 P

I don't understand why writers, and people in general, misuse the word "bring." If a thing will be going with a person somewhere, then it is "taken." If it is coming back with that person, then it is being "brought" back. A thing (in my opinion) can not be brought somewhere. It has to be taken. Here's an example from the book, "A Welcome Grave" by Michael Koryta:

Two detectives are talking about going to interview someone for a second time. One says to the other, "And this time, let's bring a tape recorder."

It seems to me it is more proper to write (or say) "...let's take a tape recorder."

What are your thoughts?

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
6/21/10 10:00 P

There seems to be a new trend with writers where action is explained in one paragraph while the same character's words are in the next paragraph. As a reader and an editor, this makes it confusing to try to keep track of who is speaking. Example:

John swaggered into the store and looked at the men behind the counter.

(New paragraph) "How's it going?"

When the speaking is separated from the action like in this basic example, how is the reader to know which of the men asked the question?

Any thoughts from anyone? Thanks.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
5/9/10 8:30 A

Thanks, Lou, for the website. I just subscribed to it. Very informative and fun.

You can't start a new chapter of your life if you keep on re-reading the last one.

Sharon -- MAINLADY
sharonallenbooks.com

*********
5/8/10 7:56 P

For an entertaining and educational site with interesting contests, visit "The Verb" at www.readingwriters.com/TheVERBhotp.h
tm

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
2/23/10 9:38 P

You are so right, Lou. I am always horrified to realize I missed something in punctuation, spelling, grammar in a post or blog. Editors are not an excuse to be lazy.

What would make a person want to read what we have to say if we cannot say it correctly? Would they really want to continue reading? Did Walt Whitman, Edgar Allen Poe, Charles Dickens, or Chaim Potok expect someone else to do the corrections or finishing work for them?

Put your best foot (work) forward!

LAURIES_PLACE
*********
2/11/10 10:36 P

Maybe I am too sensitive or maybe it is the editor in me but it drives me nuts and embarrasses me as a writer when others who call themselves writers produce posts and blogs and profile pages that are rife with misspelled words, lack of apostrophes, no capitalization, etc.

Where is the pride in what we write? Isn't image important?

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
FYI

The Write Stuff
Winter 2010 Volume 6 Issue 1

Quote Like a Pro.

As a trained journalist, I know more than most people about using quotes within copy. I've covered this topic before, but since I often see pretty basic errors, here we go again:

1. A quote should build on the copy that precedes it, not repeat it.

Wrong: The Sharks are the top team in the NHL. "Right now, the Sharks are the top NHL team," Gabe said.

Right: The Sharks are the top team in the NHL. "With less than three months left in the season, the Sharks are poised to repeat as the President's Trophy winner," Jenna said. "Of course, the trophy they really want is the Stanley Cup."

2. When your quote includes several sentences, it will flow better if you put the attribution after the first sentence, as I did in the "Right" example above.

3. Keep commas and periods inside the quote marks.

4. Always use double quotes when you're quoting someone or when word use warrants it, as in the last line of #2.

5. Never change the meaning of a quote, but it is acceptable to "clean it up" if communicating what people said word for word reflects poorly on their grammar or is unclear.

Focus on Getting Personal.

Here're more "Smart Writing" examples. Take a look at these two sentences:

* How we take care of our bodies affects our businesses.

* How you take care of your body affects your business.

Neither is wrong, but the second sentence is going to resonate more with readers because it's written as if you're speaking to each one. Remember that while you're writing to an entire audience, that audience is made up of individuals who'll likely be having a one-on-one experience with your material.

Learn more at adriennemoch.com.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
12/20/09 7:56 A

Don't think ... do.

In other words sit down and write.

Carry a little notebook with you and take notes, those will help you create your stories

Think global; act local.

Approach topics that most can relate to (if possible) in a way that YOU relate to

I'm going to go take my own tips.

GERMANPICKLE
*********
12/19/09 9:23 P

Description rather than narration is a good way to think. By this I mean instead of simply stating what something is, describe it.

"We could have save the earth but we were too damned cheap."- Kurt Vonnegut

ANDRAXIA
*********
12/5/09 10:16 A

Avoid using cliches. Here are ANSWERS to 50 of the most often used ones.

1. Hoyle
2. shadow
3. the shouting
4. the switch
5. grind
6. woods
7. compliment
8. basics
9. question
10. never
11. a hard place
12. disguise
13. pit
14. mouth
15. for the trees
16. sin
17. the old block
18. absence
19. in the rough
20. conscience
21. starts
22. and purposes
23. conclusion
24. bear it
25. gone tomorrow
26. fist
27. cry
28. an eye
29. effort
30. on life
31. my mind
32. meet
33. main
34. truth
35. ends
36. simple
37. wiser
38. so good
39. image
40. in a round hole
41. mad
42. scratch
43. leave it
44. true
45. gauntlet
46. done
47. wax
48. thinking
49. frazzle
50. havoc

Hope you had fun with this.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/30/09 6:39 A

Here's another tip that I've found useful when writing: Dialogue combined with facial expressions and body language indicates to the readers who the characters are.

You can't start a new chapter of your life if you keep on re-reading the last one.

Sharon -- MAINLADY
sharonallenbooks.com
*********
11/29/09 9:30 P

If you are writing for children, here is a brief primer on the difference between a picture book, a picture story book and a chapter book.

* PICTURE BOOK -- for younger pre-readers or beginning readers. Features pictures on every page and tells the story through both text and the pictures. Can be from zero words to 1,000. Shorter is better. They are almost always 32 pages including copyright page, title page, etc., thus about 28 pages of words and pictures.

* STORY BOOK -- also for younger readers. May be longer than a picture book, perhaps to 48 pages. Not as dependent on illustrations. Has a plot with a main character who encounters a problem, works out the problem and finds a solution to the problem.

* CHAPTER BOOK -- for young readers who are not yet quite ready for novels. May include illustrations but the story is told through the text. Generally 40-80 pages and from 1,500-10,000 words, depending on the publisher. Intended for young readers who can sustain interest through a longer plot. May be the first books the children pick out for themselves at a library.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/28/09 7:07 A

Love this one, Lou. Thanks. Hope you had a nice Thanksgiving.

You can't start a new chapter of your life if you keep on re-reading the last one.

Sharon - MAINLADY
sharonallenbooks.com
*********
11/27/09 8:19 P

Want to bring a character to life?

Give him or her a limp or loud clothes or a habit of chewing on a lollipop stick or toothpick or sucking their teeth, pulling a comb out of a pocket and combing hair or checking makeup in a mirror and reapplying lipstick.

Have person spoon ice out of glass to chew on, or put X number of Sweet 'N Lows in their coffee. Have them eat their cantaloupe clockwise or always drink a different flavor of coffee -- Hazelnut, French Vanilla, Amaretto, etc.

As an adult have them eat popcorn and Reese's Peanut butter Cups for breakfast in defiance of parents' rule that they always have fruit for their morning meal. Maybe sprinkle garlic salt on popcorn then wonder why wife doesn't want to kiss him.

Physical activity adds dimension to characters.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/27/09 8:16 P

From an old issue of Writer's Digest magazine, tips for showing the passage of time:

* PHYSICAL MOTION -- Car passes mile markers, landmarks, highway signs announcing arrival in various cities and towns. Runners pass turn one, turn two, turn three on the track and sprint for the finish line.

* PHYSICAL CHANGES IN THE ENVIRONMENT -- Cool mornings become warm afternoons and chilly evenings. Snow melts, grass grows and turns green, leaves change color.

* INTERVIEWS CONDUCTED OVER MEALS -- Arrival and consumption of food and beverages. Food orders given and taken, drinks sipped and swallowed, plates of food emptied forkful by forkful.

* CHANGES IN SUBJECT'S APPEARANCE -- Subject becomes more comfortable with the interview or more fatigued, loosen ties, take off suit coats, roll up sleeves, smoke, yawn.

* CHANGES OVER MONTHS OR YEARS -- person grows beard and hair, facial creases deepen, muscles develop, clothes become tattered.

* MOTION OF THE CLOCK OR CALENDAR -- Physical motion along with the movement of the clock -- inched their way along the icy road, arrived at the bridge, discovered the deserted or occupied cabin after days lost in woods.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/26/09 9:24 P

Thanks so much, Lou, for your work in this.

Laurie -- LAURIES_PLACE
*********
11/26/09 10:57 A

Avoid using cliches. Here are 50 of the most often used ones. Answers to follow another day.

Supply the missing parts of each worn out expression.

1. According to____
2. Afraid of his own____
3. All over but____
4. Asleep at____
5. An axe to____
6. A babe in the____
7. A backhanded____
8. Back to____
9. Beg the____
10. Better late than____
11. Between a rock and____
12. A blessing in____
13. A bottomless____
14. By word of____
15. Can't see the forest____
16. Cardinal____
17. A chip off____
18. Conspicuous by her____
19. A diamond____
20. Dictates of____
21. Fits and____
22. For all intents____
23. A foregone____
24. Grin and____
25. Here today,____
26. Hand over____
27. Hue and____
28. In the twinkling of____
29. A last ditch____
30. A new lease____
31. A load off____
32. Make both ends____
33. Might and____
34. The naked____
35. Odds and____
36. Pure and____
37. Sadder but____
38. So far,____
39. Spitting____
40. A square peg____
41. Stark raving____
42. Start from____
43. Take it or____
44. Too good to be____
45. Throw down the____
46. When all is said and____
47. The whole ball of____
48. Wishful____
49. Worn to a____
50. Wreak____

Some others:

* In clover
* In the groove
* In the pink
* In like Flynn
* In the doghouse
* In hot water
* In a pickle
* In a rut
* Keep your eyes peeled
* Keep your fingers crossed
* Keep your nose to the grindstone
* Keep your shoulder to the wheel
* Keep your ear to the ground
* Keep your head above water
* On the ball
* On the beam
* On the go
* On the level
* On the make
* On the up-and-up
* On the wagon
* On the bottle
* On the fly
* On the carpet
* On the fence
* On the fritz
* On the rocks
* On the ropes
* Up to par
* Up to scratch
* Up to snuff
* Up in arms
* Up a tree
* Up the creek

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/24/09 8:17 P

EIGHT CHARACTERISTICS OF A "DREAM MARKET"

1. Buys a large number of manuscripts each year
2. Offer a good opportunity for new writers to break in
3. Pays well
4. Pays on acceptance
5. Pays expenses of writers on assignment
6. Buys one-time or first rights and not all rights
7. Offers substantial kill fee if assignment not used
8. Treats writers with respect.

Lou -- IUHRYTR
*********
11/14/09 12:26 P

When using brand names, do your research on the proper name. Here are some examples of commonly confused trademarked names and their generic product name:

* Band-Aid - "adhesive bandage"
* Day-Glo -- "daylight fluorescent color"
* Formica -- "decorative laminate surface"
* Frisbee -- "flying disc"
* Jell-O -- "gelatin dessert"
* Kitty Litter -- "cat box filler"
* Kleenex -- generally used in reference to "tissue"
* Laundromat -- "coin-operated laundry"
* Levi's -- most commonly "denim jeans"
* Magic Marker -- "pen"
* Muzak -- "environmental music" or "sound masking"
* NutraSweet -- Specifically, it's aspartame, a "nutritive sweetner," not

Experienced Editor/Published Writer


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