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PROVERBS31JULIA's Photo PROVERBS31JULIA Posts: 5,878
11/11/19 10:27 P

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I know, right, @SWEETENUFGILL ?? I came away feeling a bit overwhelmed!!

She girds herself with strength, And strengthens her arms.
Proverbs 31:17


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SWEETENUFGILL's Photo SWEETENUFGILL Posts: 22,159
11/5/19 2:03 A

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Gill

Time Zone GMT (London) - yes, I'm hours ahead of most of you! Cornwall, UK

"...regardless of the short-term outcome, the very fact of your continuing to struggle is proof of your victory as a human being." Daisaku Ikeda

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HAPPI_PAULA's Photo HAPPI_PAULA Posts: 1,628
11/4/19 11:54 P

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Thanks for sharing those links I’ll have more time later to take a good look at them all. emoticon emoticon

Edited by: HAPPI_PAULA at: 11/4/2019 (23:55)
Positive Paula

Keep Life Simple!

Food is Medicine!

You are what you think!

My Website:

www.paulaannesley.com


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PROVERBS31JULIA's Photo PROVERBS31JULIA Posts: 5,878
11/4/19 10:43 P

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A lot of useful information - and I found some links that are geared towards American audiences. Results vary...

urbansurvivalsite.com/how-to-
stockpile
-food-budget/

traveltips.usatoday.com/stock
pile-surv
ival-food-62863.html

www.newlifeonahomestead.com/l
ong-term-
foods-for-stockpile/

morethanjustsurviving.com/che
ap-ways-t
o-stockpile/

secretsofsurvival.com/best-su
rvival-fo
ods/



She girds herself with strength, And strengthens her arms.
Proverbs 31:17


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HAPPI_PAULA's Photo HAPPI_PAULA Posts: 1,628
11/4/19 4:25 P

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I'm just starting to do my stockpile of groceries not for any reason other than an emergency like a cut in my husbands wages or some such or a power black out etc... But mainly to save money.

I'm starting my stockpile slowly. Here's how to build one taken from a site in Australia where I am a paid member on how to do one. Basically i'll just use my cleaned up laundry cupboard to stock pile and my normal pantry for the things that are opened and already in use. I'll take something I need from my Laundry cupboard stockpile from the front put it in our kitchen pantry when needed. Then when I keep adding to the stockpile to keep it up to date and stocked up i'll move everything to the front and put new ones to the back.

I'm aiming to have 3 months supply of most things stocked up. I'll save heaps of money by doing this.

As the lady Cath from cheapskates says this is how she does it what she buys and stockpiles for a year but we have to buy and stockpile for as long as we want and what we would actually use. Not just copy her list as then it's not saving money if we don't use everything she uses but we buy it just to stockpile lol

Each of us will do it a little different to Cath as she has different needs with 5 in her family all adults at home she'll need more than myself with 3 adults in the house or more than you Gill on your own. I do think it's a great idea mainly to save money and for emergencies (power black out etc) . I'm by no means into the whole prepping thing.

Here's the long how to from the cheapskates website in Australia. ENJOY:

Keep in Mind this is Australian so she shares things in AUD $$$ etc...

Sorry this is long could not put a link as I said before I am a paid member to the site (some parts are free not this part) and if I put a link it would not work unless you're a paid member so here's something awesome I can give you for free that normally would cost $30 a year to be a member of (from memory)

How to Build Your Stockpile Part 1 - April 2019



"Stockpile -

A supply stored for future use, usually carefully accrued and maintained"
I've had a lot of questions about my stockpile: how big it is, how long it took to get to this stage, what I stockpile, where I store it, where I buy the groceries, how much do I pay for them, how do I use them all - so many good questions, especially if you are new to living the Cheapskates way and/or just starting a grocery stockpile.

Over the next few weeks I'll cover the different steps to establishing a stockpile that will save you money, time and energy, but more importantly that you will use. There's no point in having a pantry full of groceries if you never use them.

When you first start to live the Cheapskates way you are very conscious of where you spend your money, especially when it is in the supermarket. Convenience packets and mixes are swapped for raw ingredients and basic pantry items in an effort to get the most from your grocery money.

Indeed many new Cheapskaters find that in the beginning they are spending more on groceries each week than they were in their spendthrifting days. This isn't unusual and is to be expected; after all many households are building a pantry from scratch as well as learning to cook this way.

It won't be long before spending will swing around and you'll be spending less, keeping a better stocked pantry and eating better than ever before. You'll also start accumulating some of your more frequently used items to use in the future. This is the start of your pantry stockpile.

Building a stockpile takes time. While it would be fun to go to the supermarket and load those trolleys with six months' worth of groceries, it's just not practical. Cost is of course a big factor, but more than that you need to have a plan, somewhere to store everything and ways to use it all up.

Start off with adding one or two extra basics to your list next time you shop. It might be an extra packet of pasta or sugar or another box of cereal. Continue in this way until you have your stockpile. Aim to have a stockpile that will let you skip grocery shopping for a week. Then aim for a fortnight, a month and build up to three months.

The thing to remember is that not everyone cooks or eats the same foods, so not everyone will stockpile the same foods, or even the same quantities.

Your stockpile, like your Emergency Fund, will be unique to you and your situation. Build it up until you are comfortable.

Then you can shop at home first, and use supermarkets to replace your stockpile items.

In Part 2 I'll share some practical tips that will help you get your stockpile started.

PART TWO:

How to Build Your Stockpile Part 2

Way back when I first started monthly grocery shopping and stockpiling, I realised pretty quickly that we use basically the same groceries month after month, with slight changes to the list to accommodate changes in season: the summer list is slightly different to the winter list. Otherwise I'm a very boring shopper :)

Boring it may be, but it makes it very easy to build a stockpile within my grocery budget.

Before I go shopping I always do a quick inventory of the pantry, fridge and freezer, then write my shopping list according to the gaps in the inventory.

When you start to build your stockpile I suggest you inventory your pantry, fridge and freezer too. It will very quickly show you the gaps, what you have enough of and what you won't need to buy for another two years (or so….).

Doing the inventories will also give you a chance to tidy the pantry, clean the fridge and defrost the freezer. These three food storage areas need to be ready to start taking your stockpile as you build it.

If you need to rearrange things do; I've swapped the tea and coffee from the top shelf in the pantry to an overhead cupboard in the kitchen that just had vases (very ugly vases), odd glasses and a couple mugs in it. Those things have all been donated to the op shop. Now the cupboard holds 12 boxes of tea bags, four 500g tins of Nescafe (on sale this week for $14.99 at IGA stores), four boxes of hot chocolate pods and 24 boxes of coffee pods. And the pantry shelf is free to hold other things I use more often.

It is important to remember, as you start to stockpile, to keep things handy and like with like. If they are too hard to get to you'll forget where they are or worse still, just not bother to dig them out. And that's money down the drain, another reason to organise your food storage!

Keeping like with like just means keeping tins together, baking ingredients together, cereals together, condiments together and on.

Once you've done your inventories, you'll be able to calculate how much of each thing you need to last the length of your stockpile. At the moment I'm aiming for 12 months of everything for my family of five.

There is a (perhaps) handy sheet you can download here (link courtesy of The Prudent Homemaker) that will tell you roughly how much of each thing you'll need per person for a year.

I'm not sure the quantities are quite accurate - according to this table I'd need to stockpile 104 kilos of pasta and 154 kilos of rice! As we eat lots of different foods, those quantities are not right for us, but they give you an idea of just how big your stockpile will need to be.

I've calculated that I will need 30 kilos of pasta - a huge difference. We eat one pasta dish a week (my boys love pasta!) and I use approximately 500g of spaghetti or noodles each time. That equates to 26 kilos a year. Adding a couple of kilos for pasta salads and casseroles brings the total for the year to 30 kilos - for the five of us. By the way, I have pasta covered - there is 37 kilos in the stockpile at the moment, enough for the next 15 months.

Twenty kilos of rice will be enough, that's what I buy each year now. Yes, we eat a lot of rice, in savoury and sweet dishes, mainly because I just like it and not just because it's cheap :)

Take a look at the sheet and see how the numbers compare to what you've estimated you'll need after doing your inventories. You might be a little surprised, like I was, or you could be completely in agreement.

How much you need to stockpile will depend on your family's size, how long you want the stockpile to last, what you eat and/or use and how much of each thing you use and/or eat and where you are going to store it.

In Part 3 I'll share the things I'm stockpiling, the quantities I've estimated we will need for one year and where in the house it's all going to be stored.

PART THREE:

How to Build Your Stockpile Part 3

Building a stockpile is a personal thing. It needs to contain items that you use, otherwise it's just wasted money. There are all sorts of lists and suggestions around, and they are great to use as a starting point.

In my dreams I can just make a list, go shopping and buy everything we need for the next twelve months.

In reality I have a grocery budget that I need to stick to, so building the stockpile must fit into my grocery budget, and if you want to build your stockpile and save money, rather than go into debt, your buys will need to fit into your budget too.

Here's a list of what is in (or will be in) our stockpile for 2016 to see us through 2016. Remember as you read this that this is for my family of 5, you may or may not use/need/want some/any/all of these things - write your list to suit your needs. And remember, I wasn't starting from scratch, I already had a very good stockpile, at least three months of most things, six months of some others and a one year supply of cleaning supplies.

Stockpile List - 12 Months Supply

Groceries

Baked Beans - 104
Baking Paper - 1
Cereal - Ricies 12
Cereal - Weet-bix -1.2kg 24
Cereal -All Bran - 24
Cereal -Rolled Oats - 10kg
Choc Bits/Melts - 12
Clingwrap - 1
Cocoa - 2
Condiments - Coleslaw dressing - 12
Condiments - Herbs
Condiments - Honey - 6
Condiments - Jam MOO
Condiments - Mayo - 2
Condiments - Nutella - 6
Condiments - Peanut butter - 24
Condiments - Peppercorns - 1
Condiments - Salt - 5kg
Condiments - Spices
Condiments - Stock cubes - 4
Condiments - Vegemite - 2
Cornflour - 3
Cream of Chicken Soup - 24
Custard Powder - 2
Dried Fruit - Cherries - 1kg
Dried Fruit - Dates - 6
Dried Fruit - Mixed Fruit - 5kg
Dried Fruit - Sultanas - 5kg
Drinks - Coffee, Instant - 2kg
Drinks - Coffee, Pods - 48pks
Drinks - Cordial - MOO
Drinks - Tea bags - 100pk - 4
Flour - Gluten - 5kg
Flour - Plain - 112kg
Flour - SR - 60kg
Foil - 1
Icing Sugar - 12
Legumes - black beans (canned) - 12
Legumes - soup mix - 3kg
Legumes - split peas - 3kg
Legumes - kidney beans - 5kg
Molasses - 1
Mustard - wholegrain - 12
Nuts: almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, peanuts
Oil - Olive - 12L
Oil - Vegetable - 4L
Pasta - Noodles - 12
Pasta - Spaghetti - 26
Pineapple rings - 12
Popping corn - 1kg
Powdered Milk - 12kg
Rice - 20kg
Sauce - BBQ 250ml - 6
Sauce - Soy - 2
Sauce - Sweet Chilli - 1
Sauce - Tomato 2L - 4
Spaghetti - tinned - 12
Sugar - 48kg
Tinned fruit - 24
Tomato Soup - 104
Tuna - 24
Yeast - 2

Freezer
Butter - 24kg
Casserole/Stewing Steak - 15kg
Cheese - Tasty - 24kg
Chicken - Drumsticks - 15kg
Chicken - Fillets - 52kg
Chicken - Wings - 12kg
Chickens - Whole - 26
Corned Beef - 12
Fruit - oranges, strawberries,
apples, lemons, peaches
Legs of Lamb - 13
Mince - 40kg
Roasting Beef - 13
Sausage mince - 5kg
Sausages - 12kg
Steak - 12kg
Vegetables - carrots - 20kg
Vegetables - celery, onion, eggplant,
capsicum, beans, broccoli, cauliflower,
sweet potato, pumpkin, tomatoes - From garden
Vegetables - corn - 12kg
Vegetables - peas - 12kg

Cleaning
Bicarb soda - 5kg
Borax - 3
Bug Spray - 4
Dishwasher powder - 12
Dishwashing liquid - 6
Eucalyptus oil - 3
Laundry soap - 3
Scrub buds - 3
Washing soda - 4
White vinegar - 5L

Toiletries
Bodywash - 12
Conditioner - 12
Deodorant - 43
Hairspray - 4
Handwash - 12
Moisturiser - 4
Mouthwash - 6
Razors - 4
Shampoo - 18
Shaving foam - 6
Soap - 60
Toilet paper - 12pk - 12
Toothbrush Heads - 6
Toothbrushes - 24
Toothpaste - 30

First Aid
Band Aids - 2
Bandages - 2
Betadine ointment & drops - 1
Ginger tablets - 1
Hydrogen Peroxide - 1
Immodium - 1
Isopropyl Alcohol - 1
Nurofen - 2
Paracetamol - 2
Saline - 1
Savlon cream - 1
Zyrtec/Telfast/Claratyne - 3

Boy we eat a lot! And that list doesn't include the produce from the garden that will be dried, bottled, pickled or frozen over the summer.

When I look at that list I wonder where in our home I'll be able to store it all, but it all fits. So where to do I store all these groceries?

Grocery items are either in the pantry in the kitchen, in other cupboards (tea and coffee are above the kettle, spices and herbs are above the bench) or the shelving. Bulk dry goods are in labelled tubs in the laundry.

Cleaning supplies are under the laundry sink. Dishwashing liquid and dishwasher powder are under the kitchen sink.

Toiletries are in the bathroom cupboards.

The first aid box lives on a shelf in the linen cupboard.

Frozen food is of course in the freezers, one in the laundry and I've "borrowed" freezer space at my mother's for the overflow.

I've found the hardest thing to store is the toilet paper, mainly because it is so bulky. At the moment it is in the garden shed and I bring in one pack a month as it's needed.

I don’t have a lot of designated storage space in this house so I make do with what I have and sometimes I need to be a little creative and shuffle things around.

As long as I remember to update the inventory when I move things nothing will get lost and I won't be tearing my hair out trying to find the peanut butter when I know we have it but it's not on the bottom shelf of the pantry!

PART FOUR:

How to Build Your Stockpile Part 4


I'm going to wind up this series with a summary of things I've covered to help you build your stockpile.

Build up a slush fund
A grocery slush fund is the way you can build your stockpile without going over your allocated grocery money or going into debt. Every week, fortnight or month when you draw your grocery money, do your shopping. Then take whatever is left and put it in the grocery slush fund. You can then use this money to buy up extra of your basic items or to buy up when items you use regularly come on a good sale.

Buy up loss leaders
Supermarkets entice you into the store by offering a few items at ridiculously cheap prices (the Tim Tams on sale for $1.49 a packet at Woolworths a few weeks ago spring to mind). These items are generally on the front page of the brochures and can be seasonal. So when diced tomatoes are on sale two cans for a dollar, use your slush fund to fill your pantry until the next sale.

Figure out your storage possibilities ahead of time
Even if you live in a small flat, you can find unused space for storage. In a box under a bed is a good spot, for example. Throw a cloth over a coffee or end table and use the space under to hide your stockpile.

Invest in a freezer
This is the single best thing a stockpiler can buy. Our first chest freezer cost just $50 secondhand and it lasted us for over 10 years and saved us thousands of dollars before it decided to stop working. Meat, vegetables, fruits, bread, butter, even milk can all be frozen for months. You can also store your dry goods such as flour, pasta, cereals and dried fruit in the freezer if you have room. Make double or triple batches of biscuit dough or an extra casserole to freeze and you won't be running to the fish'n'chip shop for takeaway when you are tired.

Shop in bulk
I have always shopped in bulk. I buy lamb and beef in bulk, chicken pieces and fillets in 20kg lots, whole chickens by the box (usually 6 to a box). Fresh meat, produce, cases of canned goods, flour, sugar, cereals, toilet paper, toothbrushes, toiletries and nappies are usually good deals. Watch prices on frozen convenience foods and non-food merchandise. Resist the 12 dozen tins of smoked oysters for 20c a tin if you only use a half a tin once a year on New Years Eve. There is no saving in buying that many of anything, no matter how cheap it is if you aren't going to use it in a timely manner (that means before the best before or use by or it just gets old and stale). It will just become an expensive waste of space.

Be selective
Don't stockpile a carton of instant coffee if no one in your family will drink it. See above: expensive waste of space.

Donate any excess
Never has my family ever become bored with something I stockpiled, but we do like to share our bounty with others. Older family members, friends and neighbours will be especially grateful when you show up with a smile and those extra staples and treats for them.

Edited by: HAPPI_PAULA at: 11/4/2019 (16:52)
Positive Paula

Keep Life Simple!

Food is Medicine!

You are what you think!

My Website:

www.paulaannesley.com


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SWEETENUFGILL's Photo SWEETENUFGILL Posts: 22,159
11/4/19 2:12 P

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Nope.

Mostly I don't have the storage space. I keep very minimal supplies in the house.

I have thought about having one - and even have an 'emergency list' made. Perhaps I should try to find a storage solution and start setting up some kind of food store. As the last person said, monitoring the dates and keeping it up-to-date might be a challenge!

Edited by: SWEETENUFGILL at: 11/4/2019 (14:14)
Gill

Time Zone GMT (London) - yes, I'm hours ahead of most of you! Cornwall, UK

"...regardless of the short-term outcome, the very fact of your continuing to struggle is proof of your victory as a human being." Daisaku Ikeda

www.sparkpeople.com/system/howitwork
s.asp


“Keep your waist to less than half your height.”


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PROVERBS31JULIA's Photo PROVERBS31JULIA Posts: 5,878
11/3/19 10:08 P

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Well... we have piles and piles of food. You didn't ask if it was an ORGANIZED system ... to one extent, there's always the possibility of natural disasters (in our area, tornadoes mostly). But even for "armageddon" types, one still needs to be watchful to rotate stock, and I'm not that good at it.

She girds herself with strength, And strengthens her arms.
Proverbs 31:17


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HAPPI_PAULA's Photo HAPPI_PAULA Posts: 1,628
11/3/19 4:07 P

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Do you keep a grocery stockpile? If so what's your reason for having one? If you don't keep one have you ever thought about keeping one?

Positive Paula

Keep Life Simple!

Food is Medicine!

You are what you think!

My Website:

www.paulaannesley.com


 current weight: 128.0 
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