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ARCHIMEDESII's Photo ARCHIMEDESII SparkPoints: (226,129)
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11/27/19 9:09 A



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Laura, congratulations on quitting smoking !!

that is a huge health benefit ! My uncle (may he rest in peace) was a pack a day smoker for most of his life. One thing I remember is that when he was smoking, his skin looked like yellow parchment. When he finally stopped (in his late 60s), I noticed that his skin had a pink shade. Never saw that when he was smoking.

Now, I would like to confirm what NIRERIN said about changing your exercise routine, but not your eating habits.

It is true. When you change your exercise routine, you may notice your weight goes up. Is this because you're gaining muscle ? Not in the first few weeks. What you are seeing IS water muscle water retention. When you work your muscles intensely, your muscle fiber soak up water like a sponge. This is what they are supposed to do. It is part of the repair process.

Your muscles will release any excess water once they've adapted to the new routine.

And I CAN confirm this because this morning, I weighed myself and I was UP 3.5 pounds !! Eating habits change ? Not really and I certainly didn't eat an extra 10,500 calories the past 2-3 weeks to gain 3.5 pounds of fat.

What happened ? I changed my exercise routine a month ago. I started taking BJJ classes. A very intense workout that my body hasn't adapted to yet.

Don't worry, this really is perfectly normal. Your body will adapt, but it's going to take time. If you smoked for years, it will take more than a few weeks for your body to heal itself.


NIRERIN Posts: 14,683
11/27/19 8:04 A

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Increases in activity often come with increases in water retention. Water is a big part in muscle repair so when you work out more you keep a little bit more on hand. If you doubled your duration and intensity plus added strength at the same time that should be balancing out by about now, though since you have so little extra weight to lose it could be hidden by other fluctuations. If I am reading your ticker correctly you should be aiming for 1/4 to 1/2 lb per week of loss, which means it can take six to eight weeks to see a pound down on the scale.It does not mean that you are doing anything wrong, it just means that you don't have the extra hundred pounds or so that yield those sizable loss numbers.

-google first. ask questions later.

LAURAB52's Photo LAURAB52 Posts: 22
11/27/19 5:13 A

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Thank You everyone for replying. Your answers do help. I was not a heavy smoker. I smoked 6 or 7 cigarettes a day. Never smoked inside my home. Hubby does not smoke. He did, when we first met, but quit over 26 years ago.
I was doing light impact aerobics before quitting for only about 15/20 minutes a day.
I also bowl every day.
I've adjusted my aerobics routine to high impact for 45 minutes a day, but also added toning and strength training for an additional 20 minutes a day. My bowling continues. I'm guessing it'll take some time for my body to get back in sync. Maybe by then my metabolism will kick back in.
Thanks again.
Happy Thanksgiving !!

I keep trying to lose weight, but it keeps finding me !!!


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HAPPYCPA1965's Photo HAPPYCPA1965 SparkPoints: (484,287)
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11/26/19 5:18 P

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I was looking for the article I read a few months ago but I cannot find it. The doctor asserted that nicotine is a poison and when you smoke, the body is constantly working to rid itself of the poison. This effort to rid itself of the poison essentially increases your metabolism. The interesting thing is the author noted that people who dip (Skoal, Copenhagen, etc.) do not have the same effect so it was unique to cigarette smokers.



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NIRERIN Posts: 14,683
11/26/19 5:10 P

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How often did you smoke when you smoked and how far did you have to go to smoke? If you averaged a cigarette an hour and you had to go somewhere else to smoke it and you are no longer having to periodically hike out to get your fix, well, you're likely not quite as active as you used to be, oddly enough. Smoking also tends to be a stress reliever, so you're likely slightly more stressed than you were when you smoked, and stress can be the great monkey wrench of life. Eventually you'll build up new stress relief and this should not be an issue long term, but it may require some waiting out for the short term. You mentioned not increasing or changing your food intake, but if you weren't tracking before and now then it's well worth getting some data on that front. You mention increasing your fitness routine, but where was it before and what constitutes this increase? A walk around the block after dinner, while good on the fitness side of things, probably is not near what you would need to balance this out. Going with the previously guesstimated 100 calories a day, that's 700 calories more a week and not an insignificant amount of increase. Out-exercising other choices tends not to be successful in the long term as you can easily ingest 700 calories in under ten minutes but would be hard pressed to burn and additional 700 calories in under an hour. I am not saying not to exercise, just that you should do things that you enjoy and work for you rather than trying to hit a certain calorie burn so that the rest of the math balances out.

I like to think that where I am now is the average of where I have been over the past months and years. Nothing in the short term will erase out what you have been doing for far longer. In other words, if you walk two miles a day every day from January 1st to June 30th, you will average a mile a day for the year even without walking at all from July 1st to December 31st. If you walked two miles a day for nine months of the year and did not walk again for the last three, your daily average would still be 1.5 miles per day. What you do evens out to where you are over time. Three months is an amazing accomplishment, but it's still in the short term range. You're at a place where you are still learning and still adjusting things you don't even realize that you're doing. You are building towards the future, but you're at a point where patience and time and not making any more radical changes is the best place to be.

Edited by: NIRERIN at: 11/26/2019 (17:27)
-google first. ask questions later.

URBANREDNEK Posts: 12,079
11/26/19 11:37 A

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My understanding is that the body burns a certain amount of calories to process the cigarette smoke, averaging 100-200 calories per day (depending on amount smoked). I haven't seen any data showing an impact on base metabolism - just that the process itself burns calories.

Looking at what you said, it looks like your body burned about 100 calories per day processing cigarettes (guesstimate of 14 weeks and 5 lbs gained).

In order to get back to a healthy balance, you will need to either add 100 calories worth of activity every day or drop 100 calories worth of food every day, or some combination of the two, in order to compensate for the loss of the "cigarette calorie burn". Unless you choose to increase your lean muscle mass and thus increase your resting metabolic rate, this will need to be a permanent change.

In order to lose the weight that you've already gained, you'll need to make the increased activity / decreased food combination be more than 100 calories per day. If you chose to go to a 250 calorie per day difference, then it will be at least 23 days before your scale shows a loss of 1 lb --- and that small of a change may not be noticed depending on your usual healthy daily fluctuations.

Personally, I quit at a time when I was getting into hiking, so I actually lost weight during the first months after quitting. The hiking also increased my lean muscle mass, which increased my metabolism, so I was able to continue eating even more than before without gaining weight.

Kudos for quitting, and for staying on top of your body's response to it! If you continue with your increased activity and keep eating the same, then you should reach a point where your lean muscle increases and your body settles back in to where you feel best.

Sir Terry Pratchett: "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good."

"The Inuit Paradox" ( discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-
paradox
): "...there are no essential foods—only essential nutrients. And humans can get those nutrients from diverse and eye-opening sources. "

SW: 258 Maintain @ 147-155


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NOLAZYBUTT011's Photo NOLAZYBUTT011 Posts: 67
11/26/19 11:01 A

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You may want to try all natural adrenaline...you can find it at Vitamin shoppe or vitamin world. It helped me stay stable. But then i went off it...i put weight back on.

SPARK_MERLE's Photo SPARK_MERLE Posts: 9,627
11/26/19 10:53 A

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Hi Laura,

emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon
First, I cannot say enough good things about how fabulous it is that you quit smoking. That is one of the very best things you could have done for your health. Way to go!!!

I am a former smoker and also had some weight gain after quitting (about 10 pounds). But, if you keep eating well, you will be able to get rid of that! In addition to any metabolism change, smoking is such a habit (as well as an addiction) that you try to replace it with something...and food is often that something. If you are not already tracking everything you eat, I would encourage you to do that for a while to be sure you really know everything you are eating. Regarding metabolism, increasing your fitness does help increase your metabolism so that is a great thing to do. If you keep up with the fitness and good eating, you will be able to lose that excess weight.

Congrats again on your accomplishment! You beat smoking, you can beat the weight!

Spark_Merle

~ Merle

"I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
Edward Everett Hale
BANKER-CHUCK's Photo BANKER-CHUCK Posts: 10,204
11/26/19 10:23 A

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I found that smoking acted like a appitite suppresent. It curbed my hunger. It kept my mind off of craving snacks.



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LAURAB52's Photo LAURAB52 Posts: 22
11/26/19 7:53 A

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Hi Everyone,
Hoping someone may have an answer for me.
I stopped smoking, cold turkey, going on 3 months now.
My problem is I have gained weight.
I read where nicotine increases your metabolism so when you stop, your metabolism slows down. Not sure if this is true.
Anyway, I have not increased my food intake. I am still eating the same as I always have. I am not eating anything different either. Yet my weight has increased, right now by about 5 pounds. I have increased my fitness routine, but so far no improvement. I'm wondering if at some point your metabolism levels off, but hopefully will kick back in where I can take this weight off.
Has anyone else who has once smoked experienced this.
Starting to get frustrated here.
Nothing seems to be working.

Thank You for any help and suggestions.
Laura

I keep trying to lose weight, but it keeps finding me !!!


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