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CHARLEEE3

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When push comes to shove

Monday, October 18, 2010

I was trying to be clever with my title, but I just wanted to share (if anybody is reading this) about some thoughts I had this morning.

I really got off my eating and activity plan over the weekend, and although I haven't analyzed why, I'm ready to get back on board today. I was thinking, I'm ready for another "push." I remembered how, when I was in sales, we would have a "push" of intense sales activity to meet certain goals. I did pretty good for the first few weeks on SP, then a slower time, then another pretty good phase, then a slower time, and now I'm ready to push again. I was thinking that this pattern can work just fine and for many of us in long-term "transition" of weight loss, it may actually be our pattern. It's just important not too get too off-track during the slower periods so that we either stay the same weight or lose a little, then we "push" again.

When I think about it, this actually how I do anything requiring effort on my part, including housework. I don't seem to apply myself for a long period of time to anything unless I'm lost in creativity or in my thoughts. So I do a bit, then relax or play a bit, then do a little bit more, then relax or play. It works for me to alternate rather than put in a concentrated effort for a longer period of time and relax or play for a longer period of time. So it's no wonder that I find I'm working on my weight loss and improving my health in the same manner.

Instead of beating myself up about the time I'm "relaxing,"I think I just need to incorporate it into my plan. I'll see how long I'm usually in a "push" then how long I'm usually relaxing my effort and just plan on doing it that way, as long as I am careful to maintain my current weight or just slow down my weight loss and not gain anything. I have a lot of weight to lose, and this might just be the key to this long-term process for me, besides allowing me to adjust to the various changes in lifestyle needed in order to maintain my goals once I reach them.

I'm just trying to work it all out, just like everybody else. If my ideas resonate with somebody, that's great. But since we are all unique, I don't expect that one method will work for everbody. That's one reason I love SP, that we can exchange ideas of what works for us and that we can incorporate the methods of others that work for us and individualize our own methods. I've been trying different methods since I was a chubby pre-teen and to me, SP is one of the absolute best ways to accomplish our goals of all kinds, especially health goals.

Thanks to all who are brave enough to post their photos, their thoughts, their favorite quotes, their activity, their successes, their "learning opportunities," their pleas for help, and their support of others! emoticon emoticon

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Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • no profile photo CD8158758
    Well, when we first start out SP recommends that we set our own rythym so to speak, just to get used to it all. Then as time goes on, you adjust. So, don't be too hard on yourself if you get off track once in awhile. But, always stay focused....keep exercising at least 3-5 times a week 30 min at a time or even 3-10 min. . You need to keep the metabolism burning the calories. If you take too long of time off the body gets lazy and you will do the old plauteau and then it will be harder to get going again. I find now that I miss exercise if I don't do it.... so I do it everyday...even if it is just a short walk. Then I feel good about what I did and feel in control and keeping on track. Keep strong and the rest will fall into place. And of course we will be here to help you out when you need us. Take care.....Connie
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    3738 days ago
  • no profile photo CD5411411
    My entire weight loss journey has been about rhythms and pushing to to the next level. Thanks for putting it into words that make sense!
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    3742 days ago
  • no profile photo CD7831238
    I like how you relate to this and how you explain the push. Good blog.

    Cherry
    3743 days ago
  • no profile photo CD8070788
    I like what BRANLAADEE1 said. I know that I tend to have 1 big week for weight loss with in a month, then 2-3 weeks of no or minimal weight loss -- seems to be how my body makes adjustments. I know that I have my biggest losses occur after a week of maintenance. So you could work your pushes to your advantage. We need to make the whole lifestyle change to see our losses maintained over time. Once I lose this ugly fat, I'm NEVER going back again.
    3743 days ago
  • BRANLAADEE1
    I started off reading this blog thinking it was silly to throttle back like that. Then I started thinking about it. Especially what you said about housework....as I sit here on my housework break getting ready for my next "push". All of a sudden it seems like a normal idea that just might work. LOL

    Then I started thinking about it a little bit more in depth. I give myself a 'rest' day during the week. I do it with foods and with exercise. Friday nights are pizza nights...with rules! No stuffed, double pepperoni, extra cheese pizza's anymore, but I do allow myself a really tasty chicken and artichoke thin crust and if it's been a really good week, I'll even allow a small slice of pepperoni. I can have a dessert on Tuesday nights, but it has to be measured and low fat. I take one day off with no exercise at all and just generally laze about.

    I think if you set up your guidelines...like only have 2 weeks of "relaxed" time. You make sure you dont gain, etc. I may work for you. The only problem I'd have is with the exercise. If I take longer than a day break with my exercise, it's like starting over. I need to keep my momentum going for exercising.

    In the end, we all need to find out what works for us! If this works for you, go for it! :)
    3743 days ago
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