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JANEYBEE's Photo JANEYBEE Posts: 2,144
10/28/15 12:24 A

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Lots of good ideas here, thank you.

Janey

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ELISADENK's Photo ELISADENK Posts: 11,828
10/27/15 6:48 P

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It seems that we rarely have an end-of-season, here.

Tomatoes can continue growing through Christmas.

Then, the bad weather hits, and nothing gets cleaned up.

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CD2348080 Posts: 34,084
9/19/14 12:22 P

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whiteangel4
Both oak leaves and pine straw tend to be acidic, so be sure to check the PH of your soil in the spring and make adjustments as needed.

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9/18/14 11:57 P

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I am turning all the soil over and then coving with layers of newspaper and then covering with oakleaves and some pine straw for the winter season

Keep on track


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GREBJACK's Photo GREBJACK Posts: 8,510
9/15/14 5:29 P

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Hm, I hadn't thought about getting a spinning composter to handle hot composting. Do you trust it with both seeds and diseased plants?

Rebecca

He drew a circle that shut me out--
Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout.
But Love and I had the wit to win:
We drew a circle that took him in!
-Edwin Markham

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CARDAMOMMA SparkPoints: (21,395)
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9/15/14 10:47 A

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Pullling, chopping, and hot composting the tomatoes and squash (many many of them! They're diseased so they can't go in the regular compost. I have two spinning hot composters I use for this.)
Our heavy fall, winter, and spring rains leach minerals from the soil, so add lime, dig in summer compost (it's not finished enough to spread over the top). and then plant either winter crops or cover crops.
Lots of pruning coming up next month: apples, pears, raspberries, and training the grapes.

I need more bark mulch for the paths. Last year I got arborist chips from a tree that came down near us. Hoping we'll get more this fall, otherwise I'll make a few truck runs to sawdust supply, which sells it.

Great time for planting!


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CBRINKLEY401's Photo CBRINKLEY401 SparkPoints: (300,965)
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9/14/14 11:27 P

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For the plots we rent from the park district - we pull all the plants. The ones that show signs of disease are hauled out of the plots - along with any tough vines. The rest get tilled in. Then we spread as much grass clippings and leaves that we can get our hands on over the plots and till those in as well - since we can keep the same plots every year. Pull the fencing, stakes, cages, and haul them home.
At home, I also clean up the beds and till in any organic mulch we used to keep the weeds down in the annual beds. Then we put a chicken wire fence around it and put in all the chopped leaves we get from our yard, to break down over the winter. I even put my kitchen scraps in with the leaves, since the compost bin fills up fast in the fall. The compost bin itself is emptied, sifted, and the finished compost put in buckets to store for the winter (I put a scoop of compost in the bottom of each hole before I plant tomatoes and peppers, since we have lots of egg shells in there and those plants need the calcium. The rest gets spread on top of the soil among my perennials.). Sometimes I will take the unfinished compost and add it to the leaf pile, and just start over with an empty compost bin in the fall and fill it up over the winter.

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CD2348080 Posts: 34,084
9/14/14 5:33 P

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Hopeful
Mulching really helps reduce water usage. It prevents a lot of the evaporation from the soil and also helps prevent weeds that would use some of the water that is available.

CD2348080 Posts: 34,084
9/14/14 5:30 P

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I use the wood mulch only on my perennial bed. Wood mulch can use some of the nitrogen normally available to plants but since the blood meal is high in nitrogen that compensates for it.

The mulch helps keep the weeds down between the plants that I am growing.

HOPEFULHIPPO's Photo HOPEFULHIPPO Posts: 7,218
9/14/14 3:03 P

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when is a good end of season? I'm thinking now...even though it's 100 degrees still here, our watering restrictions have killed my plants...I'm thinking I should take the mulching tips of leaves, meals etc and cover for hopes of rain....

Corinna
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GREBJACK's Photo GREBJACK Posts: 8,510
9/13/14 5:30 P

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wood mulch! I'm surprised at that one - I'd been told that it sucks nutrients out while it's decomposing, so it's how you mulch ground when you _don't_ want things to grow. But you've had a different experience, eh?
emoticon

Rebecca

He drew a circle that shut me out--
Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout.
But Love and I had the wit to win:
We drew a circle that took him in!
-Edwin Markham

www.fitbit.com/user/24NZF7
Eastern Daylight Time


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CD2348080 Posts: 34,084
9/13/14 4:38 P

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For my veggie bed (raised beds), after I remove all the plants, I sprinkle on some blood meal, bone meal and a little wood ash, then cover the bed with 2-3 inches of shredded leaves and leave it for the winter. In spring a I put on some compost and turn it all in.
For my perrenial beds I cut back most of the plants , sprinkle with the bone meal, blood meal and a light layer of shredded leaves. by spring most of the leaves are well on their way to decomposing. and I spread some more wood mulch over the bed.

GREBJACK's Photo GREBJACK Posts: 8,510
9/13/14 12:17 P

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cover crops? everything is permaculture anyway? last top dressing before winter? do tell.

Rebecca

He drew a circle that shut me out--
Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout.
But Love and I had the wit to win:
We drew a circle that took him in!
-Edwin Markham

www.fitbit.com/user/24NZF7
Eastern Daylight Time


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