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ARCHIMEDESII's Photo ARCHIMEDESII SparkPoints: (222,843)
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2/18/19 3:05 P



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Jim Fixx, the father of the running movement in America, died of a heart attack at age 52. I checked his biography on wiki and here's something I did not know about him.

"Fixx started running in 1967 at age 35. He weighed 214 pounds (97 kg) and smoked two packs of cigarettes per day. Ten years later, when his book, The Complete Book of Running (which spent 11 weeks at No. 1 on the best-seller list) was published, he was 60 pounds (27 kg) lighter and smoke-free. In his books and on television talk shows, he extolled the benefits of physical exercise and how it considerably increased the average life expectancy."

At the time, high cholesterol and genetic history of heart disease was blamed for his death. Even though he quit, I wonder how much a toll the two pack a day smoking had on his life expectancy.



Edited by: ARCHIMEDESII at: 2/18/2019 (15:06)
MANDIETERRIER1's Photo MANDIETERRIER1 Posts: 17,956
2/18/19 1:33 P

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I saw that story about the truck driver. Then I saw him. Oh my! So young and he didn't look overweight.

I was then thinking of convenience stores, fast food and places where truck drivers may stop to eat. Even though they are getting better with healthier options. The unhealthy abound.

You can't really blame the stores, they are a business. They cannot stock a bunch of items that will spoil. So people who stop at convenience stores. Need to start buying the healthier items. Supply and demand



MANDIETERRIER1's Photo MANDIETERRIER1 Posts: 17,956
2/18/19 1:09 P

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My mom and dad knew a very fit runner. He ate healthy and clean before such buzzwords existed. Who died from a heart attack.

Then there is Sergei Grinkoff the famous figure skater.

Genetics do play a huge role.

My dad has been on medications for blood pressure and diabetes, etc. Seems like forever. My mom, only in the past few years.



SLIMMERKIWI's Photo SLIMMERKIWI SparkPoints: (317,333)
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2/17/19 8:55 P



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A young girl who was in my daughter's Netball team died at school, of a heart attack. She was very fit, and generally healthy. Another girl in the team died having a shower - again, a heart attack, and again seemingly healthy, and very fit. She was young, - about 18 at the time. Scary considering this happened in a very small area/population.

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URBANREDNEK Posts: 10,891
2/17/19 7:42 P

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"Bottom Line: no guarantees!! Enjoy Life, make the most of it, embrace the good and the bad...."

Well said, indeed!

That truck driver situation is sad - and from the looks of the video linked, he definitely wasn't obese, and would show as "healthy" or perhaps "slightly overweight" on the BMI scale. The overall lifestyle of trucking - especially long distance - is enough of a risk factor all by itself, with the necessity of sitting still for long hours creating a huge danger of deep vein thrombosis and heart attack / stroke from those clots moving. It is fantastic that someone at the truck stop had the training to save this man - and hopefully the story will help other truckers to take steps that might help protect themselves in the future (compression stockings, more movement in the truck, more movement at rest stops). It is a high-stress industry that is very, very hard on the body.

There certainly are no guarantees, at any age, which is why I am happy to see more research suggesting that it is the overall habits and lifestyle that truly correlate to lower risk assessments - and not the number on the bathroom scale, nor a calculated BMI, nor any one of the random numbers that tempt folks to obsess over them.

Instead of worrying about what a scale says, focus on learning to prefer lots of healthy natural foods prepared in ways that you truly enjoy, choosing activities that you look forward to in places that make you smile, and sharing the foods and the activities with those you love --- and the resulting healthier lifestyle may well end up being far more important to both quantity and quality of life than any one "indicator" could show.

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LADYSTARWIND's Photo LADYSTARWIND Posts: 5,690
2/17/19 6:46 P

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...yeah...makes one realize how fragile we all really are! Take Care out there...!


Patti
"The only thing we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us."
Gandalf: Lord of the Rings


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2/17/19 4:47 P



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"Bottom Line: no guarantees!! Enjoy Life, make the most of it, embrace the good and the bad...."

Well said, Patti !

Although, I tell you something interesting that popped up in my news feed.

In New Hampshire, a Dunkin Donut's employee is being praised for saving a man's life by performing CPR after he collapsed in the parking lot from a heart attack.


www.wmur.com/article/dunkin-donuts-worker-
performs-cpr-on-man-who-collapses-at-r
est-stop/26365132


The young woman credited learning CPR when she was in college.

Now, if you read the article, here's what is scary. The man who had the heart attack was 29. Thanks to the woman, he's alive. But still, 29 and had a heart attack.



LADYSTARWIND's Photo LADYSTARWIND Posts: 5,690
2/17/19 1:04 P

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Agreed! and look what article popped up in my news feed today... How apopropriate to this thread!
www.msn.com/en-us/health/nutrition/10-simp
le-eating-habits-your-80-year-old-self
-will-thank-you-for-having-today/ss-BB
PLNyu?ocid=spartandhp


Edited by: LADYSTARWIND at: 2/17/2019 (13:04)
Patti
"The only thing we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us."
Gandalf: Lord of the Rings


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MLAN613 Posts: 23,126
2/17/19 7:19 A

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Patti: Your last sentence, "Bottom Line: no guarantees!! Enjoy Life, make the most of it, embrace the good and the bad." sums it up. We don't know how long we have but it's good to try and fuel ourselves with quality food and make the most of every moment we have above ground.

Meghan in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA


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LADYSTARWIND's Photo LADYSTARWIND Posts: 5,690
2/16/19 7:07 P

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Totally agree Archie! That's certainly my goal...!

My mom's genetics weren't as good as my StepDad's… so I have to try my best if I want to make it another few decades while enjoying myself. And even folks with great genetics...like my partner...can have health surprises. (His mom made it in pretty good health to 98...Grandma made it to 100!) He's never had any health issues. This week, out of the blue, he was diagnosed with some major thyroid issues at age 72. This is the guy who can and does go ride his bike for 40 miles...

Bottom Line: no guarantees!! Enjoy Life, make the most of it, embrace the good and the bad....
patti

Patti
"The only thing we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us."
Gandalf: Lord of the Rings


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2/16/19 5:08 P



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LADY,

I love watching the news reports when they show a local Mass resident who turns 100. A lot of people are making the century mark and yet, they may have spent their lives eating bacon, butter, eggs, bread, etc. All the things our doctors tell us will clog our arteries or ruin our guts.

I do believe that longevity does have a genetic component. If our parents and grandparents lived long lives, it's a fair assumption we should too as long as we don't "abuse" our bodies.

Take Bob Harper, one of the Biggest Loser trainers. He spent his entire life eating right, exercising, doing strength training, doing yoga, reducing stress. He should have been the poster child for healthy living. And yet, around 50 years old. He had a massive heart attack. Even he has acknowledged this.

From what he said, his condition was genetic. He had a family history of heart issues. here's the rub. Perhaps he was able to forestall having a heart attack because he DID take good care of himself. Maybe his good health was the reason he was able to survive when so many (like relatives of mine) don't.

So, back to my hypothetical 72 year old, if he hasn't had a heart attack by now because of his excess weight, poor diet or lack of regular exercise, maybe he wont if there are no pre existing genetic heart conditions. But then, Mandie does bring up a good point, how long before he might have a heart attack or get diabetes ?

One thing I've read is that if we do take better care of ourselves, while we might still have a heart attack, we reduce the risk.

Isn't that why we try to stay healthy ? Reduce the risk of diabetes, cancer or heart attack ?


Edited by: ARCHIMEDESII at: 2/17/2019 (16:47)
LADYSTARWIND's Photo LADYSTARWIND Posts: 5,690
2/16/19 3:52 P

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This comes down to the question: What is Healthy?

For Archie's example, I think the answer is yes, can be healthy... and most of that is going to depend on genetics and history.

I will give the example of my step dad.... definitely fought being overweight most of his adult years---as in, the Military MADE him fight it to meet standards. When he retired, his weight continued to go up....all the way into morbidly obese (Wt at age 88: 360+lbs.) His health metrics didn't change. Never had high blood pressure...his cholesterol was never above 140... Throughout his life, he was a non-exerciser, had quit smoking in his late 20's, but certainly enjoyed his alcohol---but seldom ever got drunk. His only medical complaint: knee arthritis as he aged into his late 70's, and he declined knee surgery. At age 87 when he went to the ER for what turned out to be a blood clot, his only prescription was for painkiller for the arthritis, and he'd never spent a single night in a hospital. The source of the blood clot was never found.... Fast forward to age 88: still taking Xarelto for clot prevention; started developing bouts of diarrhea which would come and go. Labwork still great...! Finally got jaundice; admitted to hospital. Final diagnosis: adenocarcinoma: bile duct cancer...which takes 30-40 years to develop and is only 2% of all cancers...(and most likely was the source of the blood clot). When it was finally diagnosed, he passed away within several weeks. (We were all good with his declining treatment...)

So the question remains: was Dad "healthy" all those years? His very slowly developing cancer certainly couldn't have been diagnosed, nor did it impede his living a long life doing anything he wanted to until his arthritis slowed him down. Not bad for an Iowa Farmboy who still loved his bacon/eggs for breakfast and mostly ate frozen dinners for 18 years after Mom passed away!
patti

PS His granddad lived until 94...so I guess Dad's unhealthy habits might have cut his Life a tad short.... I kept telling him to get rid of the frozen dinners--LOL emoticon


Edited by: LADYSTARWIND at: 2/16/2019 (15:58)
Patti
"The only thing we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us."
Gandalf: Lord of the Rings


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MLAN613 Posts: 23,126
2/16/19 3:02 P

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I actually work from home and still am very active.I exercise at least 60 minutes a day 6 days a week and I get my 15,000 steps in every day.. So, working from home does not equal inactivity or less than average exercise.

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2/16/19 11:05 A

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I think that the person in your hypothetical situation has a significantly worse diet than the average American and probably does less exercise than the average person considering that he works from home. :-)

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If you have formed the habit of checking on every new diet that comes along, you will find that, mercifully, they all blur together, leaving you with only one definite piece of information: french-fried potatoes are out. ~~Jean Kerr

And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. ~~Anais Nin

Life is too short for self-hatred and celery sticks. ~~Marilyn Wann


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MLAN613 Posts: 23,126
2/16/19 7:40 A

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I think it really depends and I think a person and their doctor need to look at their overall health and history. I am a bit overweight but my weight is fairly stable. Do I want to get the weight off regained? Of course but that's neither here nor there. My total cholesterol is a little high but my HDL is good. My blood pressure is good. I make mostly healthy food choices. I exercise for an hour 6 days a week. I am in my 40s, 46 to be exact, and I am not on any prescriptions; I have friends around my age who are.

I also recently heard a nutrition show hosted by actual dietitians that said the real concern may be a persons triglyceride (the fat where excess carbs are stored). If your triglycerides to HDL ration is more than 3 to one, you may have greater potential for issues. If I can find the podcast, I'll try to link it here later.

Edited by: MLAN613 at: 2/16/2019 (07:42)
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MANDIETERRIER1's Photo MANDIETERRIER1 Posts: 17,956
2/16/19 12:27 A

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My mom was like that. Overweight, mild exercise, diet not that great.

Everything was great. Then it all changed practically overnight. Probably was happening and we didn't realize it, but it seems like in the space of a year. She went from healthy, but obese. To having all those obesity related diseases.

My thought is you might not have all those diseases, yet. Give it time. You will.

Now someone who is really lean and muscular. Eats a really healthy diet. Very physically fit and active. Still has a high BMI.
That is completely different story



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2/15/19 10:05 P



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YES they CAN be. A lot of New Zealand's All Blacks (Rugby players) BMI's would be over 30, yet they are in fantastic health. They eat properly, and get a very good amount of exercise. They also don't carry much body fat - they are muscle machines!
www.newshub.co.nz/home/lifestyle/2018/07/b
mi-scale-how-accurate-is-it.html


www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_i
d=1&objectid=10585212


For those who don't know, the All Blacks are generally the BEST rugby team in the world!


Kris

Edited by: SLIMMERKIWI at: 2/15/2019 (22:11)
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URBANREDNEK Posts: 10,891
2/15/19 12:25 P

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www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC52339
14/


There have been multiple studies in recent decades showing that senior adults who are overweight, or even in to low end obesity, have a lower overall death rate from all causes. The study cited above is a good example, where they did end up with results recommending lower BMI levels than other studies, but still show that your hypothetical man would be at a "hazard ratio" of about 1. Not ideal - could be a bit better if he were to be at an overweight instead of obese BMI - but certainly within the realm of "good health, overall".

The cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and pulse would be considered "borderline", but not something that would require medication or immediate concern, unless there were other health / lifestyle issues that haven't been mentioned.

If this gentleman went to my doctor, he would be told that he was in "good health, overall" - but that some gradual changes should be put in to effect in order to maintain that good health, since he was getting to high borderline levels. My doctor would be suggesting increasing exercise to include at least 30 minutes per day of moderate to brisk walking, adding in some body-weight functional movement strength training, adding more vegetables and fruits to increase nutrients and fibre (since aging bodies often absorb less nutrients), and starting to think about what hobbies and interests would be enjoyable as they transition out of the high-stress job and in to retirement.

My doctor would adamantly warn AGAINST a deliberately calorie restricted diet and any attempts to make changes for the purpose of "losing weight". Gradual changes to include more healthy foods and activities seem to have greater long-term success at minimizing "hazard level" and improving both quality and length of life - without the added mental / emotional / physical stresses of excessive calorie restriction and unnecessary weight loss.

I'm confident about what my doctor would say, because he and my husband and I have discussed this thoroughly over the years.

While a BMI very slightly over 30 might not be OPTIMALLY "healthy" --- it certainly can be "healthy enough". Lifestyle and dietary changes for increased nutrition, minimizing other health risks, and increased strength and mobility are being shown more and more to be far more important for increased quality and length of life than some arbitrary number on a scale or a BMI chart.

Personal opinion - I am becoming more convinced by the day that calorie restricted diets for the sole purpose of weight loss are overall unhealthy, and should be heartily condemned by the medical profession. The focus on weight and BMI is seriously misplaced, and in many people does far more harm than good. The gradual change in lifestyle - more nutrient-rich food choices, more overall activity, more targeted fitness - seems to have the best long-term results for people of all ages.

I DO believe that someone with a BMI slightly in to the "obese" range can be "overall healthy" - especially if that someone is a senior. It is their overall lifestyle that will determine "healthy" or "not so healthy" - not an arbitrary chart.

Edited by: URBANREDNEK at: 2/15/2019 (12:27)
Sir Terry Pratchett: "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good."

"The Inuit Paradox" ( discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-
paradox
): "...there are no essential foods—only essential nutrients. And humans can get those nutrients from diverse and eye-opening sources. "

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ARCHIMEDESII's Photo ARCHIMEDESII SparkPoints: (222,843)
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2/15/19 9:41 A



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I have a hypothetical situation for everyone.

Let's say, there is a 72 year old male, who is 6ft 3 inches tall and weighs 243 pounds. His BMI is 30.4, making him obese. He plays some golf for exercise on the weekends, but no other physical activity during the week.

total cholesterol is measured at 196, with an HDL of 58 and an LDL of 122
blood pressure is 118/80 with a heart rate of 70 beats per minute

Nutrition is your typical SAD (standard American diet). Considered to have a high stress job.

the man's doctor has declared his patient to be in very good health, overall.

What do you think ? Do you think a person with a BMI over 30 can be in very good health over all ?

When I was obese with a BMI of 34+, my blood work was great. But my doctor told me I needed to lose weight. Isn't that what most doctors would tell their patients if they had a BMI over 30 ? Don't our doctors tell us that carrying the excess weight isn't just bad for our joints, but does cause stress on our internal organs.

However, we have also been told that if a person exercises and eats a fairly healthy diet, that they could carry a few extra pounds and still be considered healthy. Do you believe that to be true ?

Edited by: ARCHIMEDESII at: 2/15/2019 (09:46)
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