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Tips on sticking to it while fighting depression

Monday, January 19, 2015

Friends, I need help.

I know that it sound like a broken record when someone states that they have fallen off the wagon because they are dealing with emotional ups and downs.

I've had the "blues" off and on for years. It hasn't gotten to a place where I need medical intervention, but I've had the "hovering, heavy cloud" over my head and the "sinking hole" feeling. I want to find a natural way to deal with this and I've been told that healthy living can be the answer.

The problem is, I'm wanting to get back on the wagon mentally, but my body is retaliating immensely.

I think stress could be a contributing factor as well. I don't have a structured schedule at work, so that leads to a lot of very early mornings and a lot of later nights, which according to my boss, will not be changing any time soon. I leave work with such stress that I have chest pains and dread going there the next day.

Between the stress of work and having "the blues", as well as having financial struggles and slipping off the structured diet that my doctor put me on...I feel lost. I want so much and yet I can't seem to get it together. I want to feel better so that I can have a family and kick "the blues" to the curb.

So what are my fellow Sparkers' tips for sticking to it while fighting the "blues"?
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Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • BINEMELLES
    I know that hovering cloud can be a terrible weight on your shoulders. And the darker, shorter days of winter make it even harder to pick ourselves up.

    One of the few non-medical approaches that is said to help with depression is exercise. And it does not have to be a lot. My recommendation for you would be as follows: Set yourself a tiny little goal. Make it really doable, so you're not putting yourself up for failure and beating yourself up later. Say you choose to do a brisk walk outside for just fifteen or twenty minutes during the daylight hours, every day. This would be benificial in getting some exercise AND more light, so yay. And being able to really stick to it will push your confidence some more.

    Another thing you could try is this nice little tool borrowed from cognitive therapy, you could call it an "Anti-Depression Diary": Keep a pad of paper next to your bed and every night before you sleep, write down three things you liked about yourself that day. In the morning, read the list before you get out of bed.
    They don’t have to be big things, like "I am a kind person", they can be simple, such as "I like that I held the door for my co-worker", or "I like that I didn’t lose my temper in traffic today", or "I like that I am making the effort to try this exercise even if I’m not sure it will work". Stick to it for at least 30 days, it needs only a couple of minutes per night. It will prime your brain to get out of a negative rut into a more positive train of thoughts, and things we access more often become easier to access in our brains. Give it a try!
    1857 days ago
  • GAYEMC
    I have been fighting depression for most of my life and it isn't easy. I have realized though that there are things that I can change and others I can't. I try hard to let those I can't change go and work hard on the ones that I can.

    I walk a lot as I find that eases the stress and I finally got a special light this winter that is supposed to help, we'll see. I also take a vitamin D supplement.

    Good luck to you!
    1858 days ago
  • BUMBLEBEE-RN
    This isn't easy. It's hard. Plain and simple.

    Secondly, if you are battling depression -- it is even harder. If this is more than just "the blues," please consider following up with a medical professional. Use whatever tools available to you. Long term or short term.
    1859 days ago
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