SP Premium
NADS1959

SparkPoints
 

Running fast forever

Thursday, July 02, 2009

I'm just getting back into running again. I've always said the hardest thing about running is lacing up your shoes! I ran 3 uninterrupted miles yesterday for the first time in a decade. I used to run a ton in college. I ran everywhere. I ran to work and home again. I did errands with a back pack. It made me feel invincible. I could run fast forever. Once I ran 25 miles on a quarter mile track in the wee hours of the night. I leaned to the left for the next 3 days. I regret never having competed to see how I stack up and I've only run in short spurts sense then. I always ran alone and I wonder if these days, a buddy would help me stick with it longer.
I like the endorphins and I love the sense of accomplishment after the fact. I like losing inches or parts of inches here and there on my body even though there is no movement on the scale due to lean muscle development. I like how strong my legs look compared to others my age.
I've always been able to push myself harder than my body allows so I'm worried about injuries and I'm trying to take it a little slower this time. I've always believed the lions share of being good is in the head and not in the body. Thinking about how far you have yet to go or worrying about that big hill 10 minuets away can wear you down quicker than running the actual hill does. People who say they hate running but do it for the healthful aspects will never be more than just an average Joe jogger and even then probably for only a short duration. I remember heading out for a run and in the first mile or two thinking "man, I'm whipped, I'm not going to be able to do this today!" and then go on to run for 10 more miles and enjoy it. The body works the kinks out, warms up, then gets in a groove. You really can let the mind go and just let the feet move on auto pilot and let the brain wander, solve the worlds problems, what ever. It can only happen once your really conditioned, in both the head and the limbs. You lace up the shoes, you start moving forward; the same rebellious joints and muscles groan and grumble again and then after a bit, they submit to your will. You've warmed up and settled into the groove, the eyes tell the feet to step down from the curb but it wasn't you because your not even really there and at some point you come to the awareness that your not even really sure where you are or how long you've been getting there. That's the utopia some will never experience because they don't let themselves get there during their healthful aspect workout. If you can't make your own mind submit to your own will, you can't have any of that morphine- and you don't deserve it!
I want to run a 5K this summer and I want to be in the top 10 of my age bracket. I'm GOING to run my first 5K this summer! I've never trained for a race, I've just tried to run farther faster than the last time which is probably why I've crashed. It's like doing a thousand sit ups but you have to start screaming around number 20 to get them done. You start avoiding it. I'm just going to run 3 to 4 mile stints for 3 or 4 days a week over the next 3 or 4 weeks until I feel ready to start mixing in the training. All the schedules are on line at Active.com waiting for me to get there, the hardest thing I face- is lacing up the shoes!
-------Dan
Share This Post With Others
Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • GVLAKERGIRL
    From one runner to another, well said!
    3950 days ago
  • MOJS208
    Good for you!
    4061 days ago
  • TRACIELYN4
    I've always wanted to be a runner but have never been. Just a walker here. I crave that runners "high" they all talk about. Any tips on just getting started. I tried today and got to 3/4 of a mile before feeling like I was going to pass out and quit. With your attitude you will accomplish your goal in no time! Keep it up. Thanks for any tips you can give.
    4061 days ago
  • Add Your Comment to the Blog Post

    Log in to post a comment


    Disclaimer: Weight loss results will vary from person to person. No individual result should be seen as a typical result of following the SparkPeople program.